ACADEMIC SKILLS DEVELOPMENT

ASD 010

STUDENT SUCCESS SEMINAR I

3 semester hours

Enhances the Deaf and Hard of Hearing student’s successful transition from high school or the workplace to college. A wide variety of experiences focusing on selfassessment of learning style and academic goals, study skills, and independent living skills, helps the student develop knowledge and competency in a number of areas which are crucial to success in college. Does not fulfill any degree requirements. Corequisites: ASD 012 AND ASD 086 .

ASD 012

SELECTED TOPICS FOR DEAF AND HARD OF HEARING STUDENTS I

3 semester hours

Develops knowledge key to a successful college experience for Deaf and Hard of Hearing students. Topics may include interpersonal relationships, linguistics of American Sign Language, career exploration, discussion and analysis of current events, and management of personal finances. Does not fulfill any degree requirements. Corequsites:

ASD 010

and ASD 086

.

ASD 013 SELECTED TOPICS FOR DEAF AND HARD OF HEARING STUDENTS II 3 semester hours Develops knowledge key to a successful college experience for Deaf and Hard of Hearing students. Topics may include but not be limited to job search techniques, discussion and analysis of current events, creative thinking and problem solving, using interpreters in academic and community settings, and psycho-social aspects of drug abuse. Does not fulfill any degree requirements.

ASD 084

PRE-ALGEBRA SKILLS

3 semester hours

Computational, problem solving, and analytical reasoning skills with an emphasis on step by step procedure. Topics covered: whole numbers, fractions, decimals, ratio and proportion, percent, measurement, calculator use, negative numbers, and an introduction to algebra. Does not fulfill any degree credit requirements.

ASD 086

ELEMENTARY READING AND GRAMMAR

REMEDIATION

6 semester hours An intensive course designed to improve competencies in English grammar and reading comprehension. In grammar, emphasis is placed on simple sentence structure. Students are introduced to: action, linking and helping verbs; the proper use of verbs in the simple and continuous present; the 8 major parts of speech; subject-verb agreement; consistent use of verb tense; and basic composition. In reading, emphasis is placed on vocabulary building, recognition of basic literary elements, and inference. Includes 2 hours/week lab in addition to class time. Open only to students who are Deaf or hard of hearing. Instruction employs TESOL techniques in an approach that integrates reading and writing. Does not fulfill any degree credit requirements. Corequsites: ASD 010 and ASD 012 .

ASD 087

INTERMEDIATE READING AND WRITING

REMEDIATION

6 semester hours An intensive course in English writing and reading including a continued in-depth development of competencies introduced in Elementary Reading and Writing Remediation. In writing, students are introduced to or continue to develop competencies in: simple, continuous and perfect tenses (past, present and future); advanced parts of speech; simple, compound and complex sentence structures; punctuation; avoiding fragments, run-ons, comma splices and misplaced modifiers; parallelism; and writing expanded, unified compositions. In reading, emphasis is placed on building skills in vocabulary recall, identifying literary elements, locating main ideas, primary supporting points and supporting details, and inference. Includes 2 hours/week lab in addition to class time. Open only to students who are Deaf or hard of hearing. Instruction employs TESOL techniques in an approach that integrates reading and writing. Does not fulfill degree credit requirements. Pre-requisites: ASD 086 OR consent of the instructor.

ASD 092

ELEMENTARY WRITING AND READING

SKILLS DEVELOPMENT

6 semester hours A developmental course exclusively for Deaf and hard of hearing students focusing on improving reading comprehension skills, building a strong vocabulary, improving grammatical and mechanical writing skills, and writing unified, cohesive, clearly-expressed paragraphs. Instruction will employ TESOL techniques in an approach that integrates reading and writing. Does not fulfill any degree credit requirements. 138 www.nwcc.edu

ASD 093

INTERMEDIATE WRITING AND READING

SKILLS DEVELOPMENT

6 semester hours A developmental course exclusively for Deaf and hard of hearing students focusing on developing specific comprehension skills for academic content areas through more advanced reading selections, building a strong collegelevel vocabulary, strengthening grammatical and mechanical writing skills, and writing basic level, unified, cohesive, well-supported essays. Instruction will employ TESOL techniques in an approach that integrates reading and writing. Does not fulfill any degree requirements.

ACCOUNTING

ACC* 113

PRINCIPLES OF FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING

3 semester hours

Principles of Financial Accounting provides an introduction to the concepts and uses of financial accounting information in a business environment and its role in the economic decision-making process. Accounting is referred to as the language of business. In 1494 Luca Pacioli published the double-entry bookkeeping treatise which remains the foundation of accounting today. Pacioli is considered the father of accounting. “And yet five hundred years later his bookkeeping treatise remains the foundation of modern accounting and its system is still in use throughout the world. This is extraordinary” (Gleeson-White, 2012, p 30). The primary areas of study in this course include the theory of debits and credits, special journals, the accounting cycle, notes and interest, receivables and payables, accruals and deferrals, measurement and valuation of assets and liabilities, the determination of net income (profit) and the preparation and analysis of basic financial statements. Broad accounting topic areas to be covered include: • Accounting as an information system. • Measuring and reporting the operating cycle • Measuring and reporting long-term assets and longterm liabilities • Expanded presentation and analysis of accounting information Prerequisite: MAT* 094 with a “C” or better AND eligibility for ENG* 101 W.

ACC* 117

PRINCIPLES OF MANAGERIAL

ACCOUNTING

3 semester hours Today’s business environment is very dynamic and is in the midst of major structural changes. This course will examine the impact of these structural changes on the managerial accounting function. This course will be a combination of cost determination and management analysis. It will focus on traditional and contemporary modalities needed to support management’s planning and expense control decisions. Topics include cost accounting systems, work flow processes and flow charting, control chart analysis, cost behavior relationships, forecasting, budgeting, variance analysis, capital expenditure decisions, analysis of financial statements, activity based and Balance Scorecard Accounting. Prerequisite: ACC* 113 with a “C” or better.

AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE

ASL* 101

AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE I

3 semester hours

In this first course of study of the American Sign Language (the language used by the Deaf Community in the United States) students learn the fundamentals of the basic structure of ASL grammar, vocabulary, fingerspelling/numbers, visual-gestural communication, and information related to Deaf Culture.

ASL* 102

AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE II

3 semester hours

This course is designed to reinforce American Sign Language (ASL) as used by a majority of Deaf people primarily in the United States. This course continues with enabling the student in becoming more engaged with the use and content of ASL in the conversational setting. The continuation will provide the student with the skills necessary both receptively and expressively to appreciate and understand and utilize the language in its structure and format. Emphasis will be on vocabulary, ASL grammar, Deaf Culture, and conversational skills. This will also include demonstrating your expressive skills in ASL using the vocabulary and grammar learned on this level. Prerequisite: ASL* 101 with a “B” or better OR consent of instructor.

ASL* 201

AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE III

3 semester hours

Building on ASL II, this course covers in depth the structure of ASL grammar, fingerspelling/numbers, and visualgestural communication. Students also develop expressive and receptive skills in storytelling and dialogue. Corequisite: ASL* 205 Prerequisites: ASL* 102 with a “B” or better AND DSC* 114 with a “B” or better or with concurrency AND consent of instructor. www.nwcc.edu 139

ASL* 202

AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE IV

3 semester hours

Building on ASL III, students learn the structure of ASL using classifiers and directional signs, with an emphasis on processing and use of space in discourse and storytelling. Students also learn the application of the timeline in ASL and the grammar used to convey sequence of events and tense markers. Students are able to understand the difference between present, past, and future events in a range of signed material that includes familiar language in less familiar contexts. Students also develop expressive and receptive skills in storytelling and dialogue and processing that is required for higher level thinking in the field of interpreting and working with the Deaf. Prerequisites: ASL* 201 with a “B” or better.

ASL* 205

LINGUISTICS OF AMERICAN SIGN

LANGUAGE

3 semester hours Surveys theory, methods and findings of linguistic research and how it relates to ASL. Other subjects: the relation between sound and meaning in human language; social variation in language; language change over time; universals of language; and the mental representation of linguistic knowledge. Corequisite: ASL* 201 Prerequisites: ASL* 101 AND ASL* 102 , both with a “B” or better, AND ENG* 101 or ENG* 101 W with a “C+” or better.

ASL* 206

ADVANCED ASL FOR INTERPRETERS

4 semester hours

Semantics impact sign/word choice and syntactic structures when interpreting between English and ASL. In order to accurately convey the message, interpreters must understand semantic influences on both the target and source languages. This course will provide expanded understanding and utilization of American Sign Language (ASL) by analyzing semantic accuracy and discourse strategies. Students will employ linguistic theory and practice of major linguistic principles in English and ASL. This course will integrate expressive and receptive skills in ASL with an emphasis on grammar, linguistic structures, and discourse styles necessary to accurately interpret between English and ASL. The student will learn how to correctly incorporate appropriate non-manual skills, phonology, and morphology using the key components of syntax and semantics. Prerequisites: INT* 103 AND ASL* 201 AND ASL* 205 , all with a “B” or better, AND ASL* 202 with a “B” or better or with concurrency.

ANTHROPOLOGY

ANT* 101

INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY

3 semester hours

Introduces students to the principles, concepts, and methodology of anthropology. Also emphasizes human evolution, culture and its role in human experience, as well as an understanding of the nature of man in different societies. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG* 096 .

ART & ART HISTORY

ART* 101

ART HISTORY I

3 semester hours

(3 class hours) Offered: Fall Semester An extensive study of art and architecture derived from all principal art historical periods in the west: Stone Age, Egyptian, Mesopotamian, Aegean, Greek, Roman. The Medieval era will include Early Christian, Byzantine, Romanesque, and Gothic. The art and architecture of each succeeding era will be explored contextually and analyzed according to form, content, and continuity. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG* 101 .

ART* 102

ART HISTORY II

3 semester hours

(3 class hours) Offered: Spring Semester An extensive study of art and architecture derived from the three principal art historical periods of the west beginning with 13th century Italy, through the Renaissance and Baroque periods to the Modern World. The art and architecture of each succeeding era will be explored contextually and analyzed according to form, content, and continuity. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG* 101 .

ART* 111

DRAWING I

3 semester hours

(6 studio hours) Offered: Fall Semester Introduction to drawing concepts, principles, processes and materials. Topics include gesture, line quality, perspective, value, space, volume and composition. No previous art experience necessary.

ART* 112

DRAWING II

3 semester hours

(6 studio hours) Offered: Spring Semester Continued exploration of drawing concepts, principles and processes presented in Drawing I. Contemporary concepts of space, abstraction and color media are introduced. Prerequisite: ART* 111 with a “C” or better. 140 www.nwcc.edu

ART* 113

FIGURE DRAWING I

3 semester hours

(6 studio hours) Offered: Spring Semester Introduction to drawing the human form, emphasizing both traditional techniques and a contemporary approach to the representation of the figure. Includes the nude figure, portraiture, and the figure in a still life environment. Prerequisite: ART* 111 with a “C” or better.

ART* 121

TWO-DIMENSIONAL DESIGN

3 semester hours

(6 studio hours) Offered: Fall Semester Studio problems explore basic two-dimensional art elements: line, shape, value, color, and space, and principle of design, balance, harmony, contrast, and unity. No previous art experience necessary.

ART* 122

THREE-DIMENSIONAL DESIGN

3 semester hours

(6 studio hours) Offered: Spring Semester Studio problems explore basic three-dimensional art elements: line, plane, mass, volume, space, size, color, light, surface and context. Development of personal content using a variety of three-dimensional tools, materials and processes. No previous art experience necessary.

ART* 131

SCULPTURE I

3 semester hours

(6 studio hours) Offered: Spring Semester An introductory course in sculpture. Instruction in additive and subtractive sculptural methods. Studio activity will include modeling in low fire clay, plaster casting and stone carving. Projects include a sculpting portrait in clay and casting a hand from life. No previous art experience necessary.

ART* 133

POTTERY FOR NON-MAJORS

3 semester hours

(3 studio hours) An introductory course in pottery. Students will gain an appreciation for pottery and create several hand-built and wheel-thrown works. A variety of surface treatments and glaze applications are explored. No previous art experience necessary.

ART* 141

PHOTOGRAPHY I

3 semester hours

(2 class hours/2 laboratory hours) Offered: Fall and Spring Semester Development of skills in practical application to basic photographic principles. Topics include light and its effect on film, cameras and lens systems, operation of the darkroom, print finishing, and creative aspects of photography. Students must have an operable 35mm film camera with manual adjustments for shutter speed and aperture. No previous art experience necessary.

ART* 142

PHOTOGRAPHY II

3 semester hours

(2 class hours/2 laboratory hours) Offered: Spring Semester Development of practice and theory in a variety of photographic techniques sequential to those introduced in Photography I. Topics include film and print manipulation, infrared film, print presentation, and the analysis of photography as an art form. Prerequisites: ART* 141 with a “C” or better.

ART* 151

PAINTING I

3 semester hours

(6 studio hours) Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters Introduction to the principles, processes and materials of oil painting. Topics include paint identification and application, use of color, basic spatial relationships, and composition. No previous art experience necessary.

ART* 152

PAINTING II

3 semester hours

(6 studio hours) Offered: Spring Semester An intermediate course in painting. Topics include spatial relationships, composition, abstraction, and self-expression. Prerequisite: ART* 151 with a “C” or better.

ART* 161

CERAMICS I

3 semester hours

(6 studio hours) Offered: Fall Semester An introductory course with an emphasis on handbuilding and an introduction to basic throwing. In handbuilding the focus will be on pinch, coil, and slab methods. In throwing, cylindrical forms will be explored. Instruction in glaze application and kiln loading. No previous art experience necessary.

ART* 176

DIGITAL VIDEO ART I

3 semester hours

(6 studio hours) Offered: Spring Semester An introductory course investigating digital video as an extension of the fine arts. Formal attributes, which make up the language of video, including time, sound, content, and composition, will be investigated as tools of expression and devices for creating meaning. Basic production techniques such as story boarding, cinematography, lighting, and editing will be acquired through creative problem solving. Through both a survey of historical and contemporary video art and in responding to collective and individual assignments, students will become critically observant and sensitive to video as a time based medium. No previous art experience necessary. Computer literacy is essential to be successful in this course. www.nwcc.edu 141

ART* 187

MUSEUM TREASURES

1 semester hour

A study of one or more of the permanent collections or special collections and special exhibitions of the great museums along New York City’s “Museum Mile,” The Fenway in Boston, or other locations.

ART* 249

PHOTOGRAPHY INDEPENDENT STUDY

3 semester hours

(6 studio/laboratory hours) This course provides the student an opportunity to apply photographic skills in the development and execution of an independent and creative photography portfolio by using traditional darkroom techniques or by using digital techniques. Topics include portfolio proposals, identifying a creative style, advanced printing techniques, and skills in preparing advanced portfolios and exhibits. Prerequisite: ART* 270 with a “C” or better AND consent of the instructor.

ART* 270

DIGITAL IMAGING

3 semester hours

(6 studio hours) Offered: Fall Semester The basis of Digital Imaging is the modification of photographic images through the use of computer technology. Students will learn a broad range of digital darkroom skills and engage with a variety of creative issues. Students will explore the use of digital images for print and screen based presentation. One of the core concepts is that computer technology is no less an art medium than traditional photography, oil paint or a sculptor’s chisel. Just as with these traditional artistic mediums, once an artist has gained facility with digital technology, that artist’s creative capacities and opportunities have been greatly expanded. Prerequisite: ART* 141 AND ART*142 with a “C” or better AND consent of instructor.

ART* 296

ADVANCED STUDIO

3 semester hours

(6 studio hours) An advanced course in studio art where students develop a body of work for portfolio or exhibition. Studio problems address the relationship of form to personal content as well as contemporary issues in art. Students research ideas, execute visual journals and create original works using selected media. Prerequisite/Corequisite: ART* 111 , ART* 112, AND ART* 151 all with a “C” or better, OR consent of instructor. ART* INDEPENDENT STUDIO STUDY 1, 2 or 3 semester hours 119 Drawing 159 Painting 219 Figure Drawing 229 Design 239 Sculpture 249 Photography 259 Water Col or 269 Pottery 233 Graphic Design An opportunity to apply studio skills through the development and execution of independent creative art in various studio disciplines. Student’s written objectives, procedures, and credit hours must be approved by the supervising faculty. A student may repeat the course but total credits earned may not exceed six. Prerequisites: Successful completion of appropriate courses (such as ART* 122, 141, 152, 164, 211, and GRA* 254 ), with a “C” or better, AND consent of instructor.

ASTRONOMY

AST* 111

INTRODUCTION TO ASTRONOMY

4 semester hours

(3 class hours/2 laboratory hours) Offered: Spring Semester For non-science AND science majors. An introduction to the basic concepts of classical and modern astronomy and its application utilizing hands-on experiences. Topics include the principles of celestial coordinate systems; telescope design and use; fundamental physical laws and their applications; the evolution of stars, galaxies, and the universe; modern cosmology; and astrobiology. Students develop a working knowledge of the night sky through hands-on experiences with direct observations, computer simulations and applied use of a telescope in the required lab. Use of computers is an integral part of this course. Prerequisites: Eligibility for MAT* 137 X AND ENG* 101 .

BIOLOGY

BIO* 110

PRINCIPLES OF THE HUMAN BODY

3 semester hours

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters For non-science majors. This course is designed as an introduction to the basic biological principles that support human life. The cellular nature of life is the basis of the course and the organization and function of organs and organ systems are emphasized. In addition to the textbook, students use a variety of resources from traditional print to electronic media to acquire and evaluate relevant scientific content. Selected body systems and disease states are also discussed. The use of computers and Blackboard are integral aspects of this course. This course can be taken with or without BIO* 110 L. This course cannot be used as the prerequisite for BIO* 211 , BIO* 235 , OR VET* 201 . Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG* 101 . 142 www.nwcc.edu

BIO* 110

L PRINCIPLES OF THE HUMAN BODY

LABORATORY

1 semester hour (2 laboratory hours) Laboratory to accompany BIO* 110 Principles of the Human Body lecture. Laboratory activities supplement BIO* 110 lecture content. The structure and function of animal cells and human body systems will be explored. Corequisite/Prerequisite: BIO* 110 Lecture.

BIO* 121

GENERAL BIOLOGY I

4 semester hours

(3 class hours/3 laboratory hours) Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer Semesters For science majors. This lab science course focuses on aspects of plant, animal and bacterial cell biology. Cellular biochemistry, including cellular respiration and photosynthesis, reproduction, genetics and evolution will be covered. The use of computers and Blackboard are integral aspects of the course. This course can be used as a prerequisite for BIO* 211 and BIO* 235 . Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG* 101 . COL* 099 or COL* 100 with a “C” or better or equivalent is HIGHLY recommended

BIO* 122

GENERAL BIOLOGY II

4 semester hours

(3 class hours/3 laboratory hours) Offered: Spring Semester, Even Numbered Years For non-science AND science majors. This lab science course focuses on the biology of organisms including plant and animal structure and function, nutrition, life cycles, and ecological relationships; and the origin and evolution of life. The use of computers and BlackBoard are integral aspects of the course. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG* 101 . COL* 099 or COL* 100 with a “C” or better or equivalent is HIGHLY recommended.

BIO* 127

CELL BIOLOGY WITH ORGAN SYSTEMS

4 semester hours

(3 class hours/2 laboratory hours) Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters For science majors. This one semester laboratory science course covers principles of animal cell biology, including biological chemistry, cell structure and function, human genetics, cell division, cellular respiration, and protein synthesis. These concepts are applied to a study of the structure and function of the major organ systems of the human body. The use of computers and Blackboard are integral aspects of the course. The course can be used as a prerequisite for BIO* 211 or 235. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG* 101 . COL* 099 or COL* 100 with a “C” or better or equivalent is HIGHLY recommended.

BIO* 155

GENERAL BOTANY

4 semester hours

(3 class hours/3 laboratory hours) Offered: Spring Semester, Odd Numbered Years For non-science AND science majors. This lab science course focuses on an introduction to the study of the structure, reproduction, and physiology of plants. The evolutionary development of the plant kingdom will be stressed, as will their ecological and economical significance. Laboratory classes will include offsite fieldwork and field trips to provide hands-on experience in identification of plant species and the role of plants in nature. Projects in lab will emphasize the importance of plants in human society. The use of computers and Blackboard are integral aspects of the course. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG* 101 .

BIO* 178

GENERAL ECOLOGY

4 semester hours

(3 class hours/3 laboratory hours) Offered: Fall Semester For non-science AND science majors. An introduction to the basic principles of ecology including the constant change of Earth systems, populations, and communities over time; concepts of adaptation, natural selection, evolution, species and speciation; interactions of organisms with each other and the physical environment. Applications of lecture topics to current conservation and environmental issues are emphasized. Field trips to outdoor laboratory sites are required. Laboratory topics covered include: population growth, competition, species interactions, trophic dynamics, habitat description, animal behavior, climate modeling, and biodiversity/community analysis. Portions of the laboratory exercises will focus on environmental issues and the measurement of environmental data. The use of computers and Blackboard are integral aspects of this course. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG* 101 .

BIO* 211

ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY I

4 semester hours

(3 class hours/3 laboratory hours) Offered: Fall Semester This course is the first semester of a two semester sequence that provides a comprehensive study of the structure and function of the human body. Anatomy and Physiology I covers terminology, tissues, integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems and their relationships to other systems. The physiology of movement is emphasized. Selected pathology examples are examined. Students study the relationship between structure and function using interactive physiology software, diagnostic imaging, dissection, and histology slides. The use of computers and Blackboard are integral aspects of this course. Corequisite: CHE* 111 or CHE* 121 . Prerequisites: BIO* 121 or BIO* 127 AND ENG* 101 or ENG* 101 W, both with a “C” or better. www.nwcc.edu 143

BIO* 212

ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY II

4 semester hours

(3 class hours/3 laboratory hours) Offered: Spring Semester A study of the structure and function of the human body. Includes a detailed analysis of the nervous, endocrine, digestive, respiratory, circulatory, lymphatic, urinary and reproductive systems. Pathology and disease applications are covered. Students examine the relationship between structure and function using interactive anatomy software, laboratory dissection, interactive physiology software, and histology slides. The use of computers and Blackboard are integral aspects of this course. Prerequisite: BIO* 211 with a “C” or better.

BIO* 235

MICROBIOLOGY

4 semester hours

(3 class hours/3 laboratory hours) Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters Elements of microbiology including the structure, classification, and physiology of bacteria and viruses. Infection, immunity, and the destruction of microorganisms are emphasized. Laboratory includes sterile techniques, micro chemical analysis, and identification of unknowns. Recommended for Allied Health and Biology majors. The use of computers and Blackboard are integral aspects of the course. Prerequisite: BIO* 121 or BIO* 127 AND CHE* 111 or CHE* 121 AND ENG* 101 or ENG* 101 W, all with a “C” or better.

BIO* 270

ECOLOGY

4 semester hours

(3 class hours/3 laboratory hours) Offered: Fall Semester For science majors. An appreciation for ecological principles is developed through lecture and laboratory exercises. Primary literature is used to explore energy flow and biogeochemical cycling, as well as the many facets of population and community dynamics. All are explored further in the field and in the lecture. Other topics include the ecosystems and the physical constraints on life, biodiversity, genetics and genetic drift, speciation, community energetics, conservation biology, and local/global ecological issues. Emphasis is on primary literature, problem-solving, and exposure to ecological research techniques. Field trips to outdoor laboratory sites are required. Using common ecological methods, laboratory exercises will be conducted in the field that accompany the topics covered in lecture. Applied statistics will be utilized by students to analyze the class data. Topics that may be covered will include: physical constraints, population dynamics, competition, species interactions, habitat classification, community structure analysis, animal behavior, and conservation biology. The use of computers and Blackboard are integral aspects of the course. Prerequisite: ENG* 101 or ENG* 101 W AND MAT* 167 AND BIO* 121 , all with a “C” or better. BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT

ADMINISTRATION

BBG* 210

BUSINESS COMMUNICATION

3 semester hours

Communication skills are critical to effective job placement, performance, career advancement, and organizational success. This course focuses on the development of skills in effective communication for personal, business, and professional use. It includes oral and written communication, nonverbal communication, listening skills, team development, oral presentations, job search skills, resume and cover letter preparation, and interviewing techniques. Prerequisite: ENG* 101 or ENG* 101 W with a “C” or better.

BBG* 231

BUSINESS LAW I

3 semester hours

A study of the legal rights, duties and responsibilities of owning a business. This course examines the components of common law, the legal system, contracts and torts. The course also covers areas of the Uniform Commercial Code, sales of goods, warranties, product liabilities and corporate crime. Prerequisite: ENG* 101 or ENG* 101W with a “C” or better.

BBG* 294

BUSINESS INTERNSHIP

3 semester hours

This is a work experience course for outstanding business students who want a challenging opportunity to apply their knowledge and learn from experience in a business or community organization. Students are evaluated in an intern position obtained by the student and agreed upon by the supervisor of the cooperating worksite. Business interns are required to work a minimum of 120 hours during the semester and meet with the instructor on a regular basis. Students must complete and submit an application to the course instructor for review prior to enrolling in the class. Prerequisite: ENG* 101 or ENG* 101 W, successful completion of 15 credit hours of study in business courses (with a “C” or better in all classes), AND consent of instructor.

BFN* 201

PRINCIPLES OF FINANCE

3 semester hours

This course builds the baseline business finance skills needed to make sound quantitative/systematic business decisions. Topics include the concepts of financial analysis or the ability to not only manipulate financial data, but also to interpret the numbers so meaningful conclusions can be drawn; the time value of money; risk and return measures; firm valuation methods; corporate restructuring and capital structure. Additionally, at some time during their growth and maturation, virtually every business will find itself in a financial crisis where insolvency is imminent and the business’ continued existence as a going concern is in doubt. Students 144 www.nwcc.edu will be exposed to the theory and practice of corporate financial distress (including bankruptcy) and will learn how to evaluate the level of adversity of a distressed business. Prerequisites: This is an upper level advanced course. Therefore, financial literacy is necessary. Prerequisite: ACC* 113 AND BMG* 202 , both with a “C” or better, or consent of instructor. MAT* 167 is highly recommended.

BMG* 202

PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT

3 semester hours

Principles of Management is a course that covers in depth the theory and practice of management as a discipline and process. The Vision to Value Creation Model will be the primary tool employed to introduce the four major management principles – Planning (Strategic Value), Organizing (Organizational Design & Structure Value), Leading (21st century leadership value), and Controlling (Learning Value). Major topic areas include: The evolution, development and scope of management, growth performance measures and basic design school model strategic planning process, managing the corporate vision and mission in a continuously dynamic business landscape, 21st century leadership characteristics, and the challenge of leadership to create value through organizational alignment. Emphasis will be given to the importance of managing in a global environment and in understanding the ethical implications of managerial decisions. Prerequisites: Eligibility for ENG* 101 W or ENG* 101 AND MAT* 137 X.

BMG* 210

ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR

3 semester hours

Behavior is related to past events, thoughts, dreams, comments, and actions, and is weaved into values, beliefs, ideologies, interactional patterns, and activities. These characteristics when combined with the complexity of organizational structure can result in a wide performance range. Students will be exposed to organization theory, structure, design applications, and the management of organizational behavior in this course. Heavy emphasis on class participation and case studies. Prerequisites: PSY* 111 and BMG* 202 , both with a “C” or better.

BMG* 220

HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

3 semester hours

Offered: Spring Semester An introduction to Human Resource Management. Includes the functions of human resource management: job analysis and planning, recruiting, staffing, orientation and training, performance appraisal, career planning, compensating, and motivating. The diversity of the workforce and the legal content of employment decisions will also be studied. Prerequisite: BMG* 202 AND ENG* 101 W or ENG* 101 , both with a “C” or better.

BMG* 250

WOMEN IN MANAGEMENT

3 semester hours

This course explores a variety of issues affecting women in managerial roles. Focus will be on recognizing and overcoming barriers and equipping women with the skills needed to succeed as business leaders in the workplace. Topics include leadership and communication styles, gender and management style, the glass ceiling, workforce diversity, career development, networking, mentoring, work/life balance and others. Prerequisite: Eligibility f or ENG* 101 .

BMK* 140

RETAILING

3 semester hours

Retailing principles and applications presented from a management perspective. Includes opportunities and trends, merchandise selection, inventory management promotional programs, pricing decisions, location decisions and financial analysis. Prerequisite: BMK* 201 with a grade of “C” or better.

BMK* 201

PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING

3 semester hours

Offered: Fall semester The dynamics of the marketing function in satisfying society’s needs. Includes the economic, psychological, and sociological aspects of buying behavior and the elements of the marketing mix - products and services, promotions, pricing, and distribution. Prerequisites: Eligibility for ENG* 101 AND BMG* 202 with a grade of “C” or better, or with concurrency.

BMK* 220

SALES

3 semester hours

Factors involved in effective selling. Methods of conducting sales presentations. Application of psychological and persuasive selling techniques. Development of characteristics for good salesmanship. Prerequisite: BMK* 201 with a “C” or better.

BMK* 230

ADVERTISING & PROMOTION

3 semester hours

Advertising and Promotion covers in depth the advertising environment, process, media planning, and brand promotion. Advertising is a study in anthropology as the advertiser’s intent is to convey an image of the product that includes origins, rituals, physical characteristics, environments, social relationships, and beliefs in a society over time. In other words, over time the advertised product/service takes on cultural attributes. It is no longer a product/ service but a way of life, an attitude, a set of values, a look, an idea that evokes an emotional response. Prerequisite: BMK* 201 with a “C” or better. www.nwcc.edu 145

CHEMISTRY

CHE* 111

CONCEPTS OF CHEMISTRY

4 semester hours

(3 class hours/2 laboratory hours) For non-science AND science majors. Inorganic chemistry, elements, atomic structure, chemical and physical bonding, compound formation and chemical nomenclature, chemical reactions, thermo-chemistry, aqueous solutions, electrochemistry, and equilibrium. Laboratory related to material covered in lecture. The use of computers and Blackboard are integral aspects of the course. Not open to students who have completed CHE* 121 or CHE* 122 . Prerequisites: Eligibility for MAT* 186 AND ENG* 101 .

CHE* 121

GENERAL CHEMISTRY I

4 semester hours

(3 class hours/3 laboratory hours) Offered: Fall Semester For science majors. Principles, theories, and laws of chemistry dealing with chemical bonding, molecular formation, periodic trends, states of matter, gas laws, and thermochemistry. The use of computers and Blackboard are integral aspects of the course. Prerequisites: Eligibility for MAT* 186 AND ENG* 101 .

CHE* 122

GENERAL CHEMISTRY II

4 semester hours

(3 class hours/3 laboratory hours) Offered: Spring Semester Chemical reaction theory, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, gaseous equilibria, aqueous and nonaqueous solutions, acid-base theory, electrochemistry, coordination chemistry, environmental chemistry, organic and biochemistry. The use of computers and Blackboard are integral aspects of the course. Prerequisite: CHE* 121 with a “C” or better

COLLEGE FORUM

COL* 099

FIRST YEAR EXPERIENCE

3 semester hours

A First Year Experience course, students will gain college success skills and basic knowledge in a listed discipline. Students will learn time management, effective study skills and information literacy skills. The discipline content focuses on basic principles of a particular discipline for students who wish to strengthen their college success skills before registering for college level discipline-specific courses. Students will also develop basic computer skills including email, word processing, and web navigation through the use of ePortfolio and Blackboard. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG* 096 .

COL* 100

COLLEGE FORUM

1 semester hour

This College Forum course introduces strategies and skills for success at NCCC and beyond, within a listed discipline. Students will learn how to be proactive in their educational pursuits and how to access a broad range of support services that are available. This one credit class will help students navigate college and ultimately achieve their goals. Students will also develop basic computer skills including email, word processing, and web navigation through the use of Blackboard. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG* 096 .

COMMUNICATION

COM* 173

PUBLIC SPEAKING

3 semester hours

Development of poise and self-confidence in speaking before an audience. Conversational tone and clarity of expression are stressed. Practice in basic ideas of public speaking: content, organization, audience appeal, and delivery. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG* 096 .

COMPUTER AIDED DRAFTING

CAD* 220

3D PARAMETRIC DESIGN (SOLIDWORKS)

3 semester hours

Offered: Spring Semester This course introduces students to the engineering design processes utilizing the SolidWorks 3D computer-aided design modeling application software. Students will construct parts, solid models, assemblies, as well as generate orthographic drawings and add dimensions to produce engineering document packages. Proficiency with computers is required.

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS

CSA* 105

INTRODUCTION TO SOFTWARE

APPLICATIONS

3 semester hours The computer plays a significant role as a productivity tool in many fields of study and employment. This course focuses on integrating comprehensive computing skills as a means to introduce students to the knowledge, skills, and techniques necessary to achieve proficiency in the Microsoft Office software applications suite (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Access). The computer operating system, file management operations, computer concepts, and vocabulary are included as integral elements to understanding the software applications environment. Students will examine productivity and computing procedures in workplace and academic settings, enhance their computer skills, and be able to critically apply these skills in various situations. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG* 101 or ENG* 101 W. 146 www.nwcc.edu

CSA* 135

SPREADSHEET APPLICATIONS

3 semester hours

A detailed development of the functions and applications of spreadsheet application software. The electronic spreadsheet, business graphics and data manager aspects will be explored, using the commands of Microsoft Excel f or Windows. Upon completion of the basic fundamentals of functions and commands, the programming macros will be introduced, allowing the student to take full advantage of the power of spreadsheet software. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG* 101 or ENG* 101 W and CSA* 105 with a “C” or better or with concurrency.

CSA* 140

DATABASE APPLICATIONS

3 semester hours

This course will introduce the student to the concept of a database management system and its integral role in today’s workplace. The course will guide the student through the design, development and implementation of a database system using Microsoft Access. This hands-on course will introduce the student to the techniques and capabilities of Access, and how to utilize this database development program as a tool to solve common business problems. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG* 101 and CSA* 105 with a “C” or better or with concurrency. .

COMPUTER SCIENCE

CSC* 102

INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER SCIENCE

3 semester hours

This introductory course emphasizes the impact computers have on society and our interaction with them. Students are also given an introduction to information retrieval using e-mail and Internet access both through our online course delivery system, Blackboard, and through other online search techniques. Topics include CPU, peripheral equipment, software applications, programming languages, computer ethics, and computer crime. The history of the computer and the capabilities and limitations of these devices are also presented. Students are also introduced to applications such as Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG* 101 .

CSC* 104

INTRODUCTION TO LOGIC AND PROGRAMMING

4 semester hours

Study of computer programming and logic as applied to real world problems with solutions designed and implemented in the C programming language. Topics include set theory, Boolean algebra, truth tables, logic to program translation, basic algorithm development, generic selection and repetition, data types and memory variables, and the use of common programming tools. Prerequisites: Eligibility for ENG* 101 AND MAT* 137 X.

CSC* 180

COMPUTER ETHICS

3 semester hours

A study in the ethics of computer usage as it applies to the Internet. Issues discussed include privacy, speech and regulation of the Internet, security, intellectual property and codes of ethics and conduct. Case studies in each area will be examined. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG* 101 .

CSC* 223

JAVA PROGRAMMING I

4 semester hours

A course in the Java programming language that uses modular programming and emphasizes object oriented techniques. This course will address event driven programming in the Windows environment and interfaces to the Internet. Prerequisite: CSC* 104 with a “C” or better.

CSC* 233

DATABASE DEVELOPMENT I

4 semester hours

Course covers the concepts of data organization f or designing databases and creating business computer systems. Data schemes and structures, querying, searching, updating and editing, indexing, sorting, screen formatting, and linking files will be emphasized. Students will develop queries using standard SQL. Taking CSC* 250 concurrently is HIGHLY recommended. Prerequisite: CSC* 104 with a “C” or better. Corequisite: CSC*250

CSC* 236

INTRODUCTION TO CLIENT-SERVER

SYSTEMS

3 semester hours A course in the design and development of n-tier clientserver applications. Students will develop both web and intranet solutions for multi-platform projects. Topics will include human computer interfaces, client application development, brokers and remote procedure calls, server programming and scripting, and database integration. Students will analyze case studies of real world applications, and build their own working versions. Prerequisite: CSC* 223 with a “C” or better.

CSC* 250

SYSTEMS ANALYSIS & DESIGN

3 semester hours

Introduction to analysis and design of business management systems through the three stages of business system design: analysis of information flow, systems specification and equipment, and selection and implementation of the system. Project management, requirements planning, feasibility analysis, and project estimating will be discussed. Prerequisite: CSC* 104 with a “C” or better. Corequisite: CSC* 233 . www.nwcc.edu 147

CSC* 295

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION/WORK

EXPERIENCE

3 semester hours This is a work experience course for computer systems technology students who want a challenging opportunity to apply their knowledge and skills in a business, education, or community organization. Students are evaluated in an intern position obtained by the student in collaboration with a faculty advisor, and agreed upon by the supervisor of the cooperating worksite. Students will engage in periodic written reports to the faculty advisor and site supervisor, and present final summaries of their field work experiences at the end of each semester. Students are required to work a minimum of 120 hours during the semester and have regular contact with their faculty advisor. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

CSC* 298

SPECIAL TOPICS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE

3 semester hours

The topics and delivery method of this course vary. It may be a distance learning, online discussion class, centering on questions and issues of current computer topics, researched though the Internet. It may also target specific areas of computer hardware, software, networking, and telecommunications with focused hands-on modules.

COMPUTER SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY

CST* 151

WEB CONSTRUCTION

3 semester hours

The design elements, organization, page layout, navigation, visual presentation and continuity are some of the topics to be included as subjects in this course. As a beginning course in the Web Design & Development program, this course will also cover Internet vocabulary and concepts as well as file management tasks. Students will use online resources to supplement any online presentations by the instructor, and will complete a website project using template software tools at host websites online. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG* 101 .

CST* 154

WEB CODING AND DEVELOPMENT

4 semester hours

A complete course that covers the coding syntax to create webpages for the Internet. The two main coding languages of XHTML (& HTML v.4) and JavaScript are the emphasis of the course. All of these coding topics follow the W3C (World Wide Web Consortium) guidelines. [The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) develops interoperable technologies (specifications, guidelines, software, and tools) to lead the Web to its full potential.] The full scope of the HTML/XHTML techniques and the interactive capabilities of JavaScript are examined and implemented as students create their own comprehensive webpages. Prerequisite: CST* 151 with a “C” or better AND eligibility for ENG* 101 .

CST* 180

NETWORKING I

4 semester hours

An introduction to computer networking concepts. Topics include the functions of the ISO/OSI reference model; data link and network addresses; the function of a MAC address; data encapsulation; the different classes of IP addresses (and subnetting); and the functions of the TCP/IP network-layer protocols. The student learns to plan, design and install an Ethernet LAN using an extended or hierarchical star topology; to select, install, and test cable and determine wiring closet locations; to perform beginning network maintenance, tuning, and troubleshooting along with basic documenting, auditing and monitoring of LANs. The course will prepare students for testing in Network+ certification. Prerequisite: CSC* 104 with a “C” or better AND eligibility for ENG* 101 .

CST* 201

INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT INFORMATION

SYSTEMS (MIS)

3 semester hours An introductory course to provide a real-world understanding of information systems, giving students a foundation in business-related technology (IT). This course presents a balance of technical information and real-world applications. Students study innovative uses of information technology and its benefits and risks. Contemporary concepts such as supply chain management systems, data warehousing, business intelligence systems, knowledge management, Web-based electronic data interchange, and software as a service are topics covered in this course. Prerequisites: Eligibility for ENG* 101 AND MAT* 137 X.

CST* 210

OPERATING SYSTEMS

3 semester hours

Topics include processor management, file systems, process management and scheduling algorithms, device management, memory management, and data integrity. The major operating systems of the various hardware platforms will be analyzed, including DOS, Android, IBM OS/2, Unix, Linux, and the Microsoft Windows family.

CRIMINAL JUSTICE

CJS* 101

INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE

3 semester hours

Offered: Fall Semester History, development, and philosophy of criminal justice in a democratic society; introduction to agencies involved in the administration of criminal justice; career orientation. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG* 096 .

CJS* 102

INTRODUCTION TO CORRECTIONS

3 Semester Hours

A study of the history, philosophy, and evolution of corrections as well as the functions of U.S. jails and prisons. The course also examines the procedures used by state and federal courts that result in sentencing of offenders to penal institutions and community-based supervision and treatment programs. Prerequisites: CJS* 101 AND eligibility for ENG* 101 W.

CJS* 120

POLICE AND THE COMMUNITY

3 semester hours

Offered: Spring Semester The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the various aspects of the philosophy of policing known as Community Policing. Community Policing involves partnership among the police, the community and other government agencies. Community Policing is government’s answer to customer service. Students are taught the evolution of policing ranging from the political era to the professional era. Classroom instruction of the specific aspects of Community Policing are supplemented with practical applications within nearby communities. Course may require a visit to a local Community Court. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG* 101 W.

CJS* 211

CRIMINAL LAW I

3 semester hours

Offered: Fall Semester Examination and study of criminal statutes with the emphasis on theory and philosophy of law; relationship of law and society. Prerequisite: CJS* 101 with a “C” or better AND eligibility for ENG* 101 .

CJS* 213

EVIDENCE & CRIMINAL PROCEDURE

3 semester hours

Offered: Spring Semester Types of criminal evidence; criminal procedure in various courts, including but not limited to supreme and state court decisions. Arrest, search, and seizure; discretion, and suppression of evidence if not properly collected. Corequisite: ENG* 101 . Prerequisites: CJS* 101 with a “C” or better.

CJS* 220

CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION

3 semester hours

Offered: Fall Semester Fundamentals of criminal investigation; theory and history; crime scene to courtroom with emphasis on techniques appropriate to specific crimes. Students may be required to participate in a mock crime scene investigation where they will put into practice techniques learned in the classroom. Prerequisite: CJS*101 with a “C” or better.

CJS* 225

FORENSIC SCIENCE

3 semester hours

Offered: Varies Collection, identification, preservation, and transportation of physical evidence; crime laboratory capability and limitations; examination of physical evidence within the resources of the investigator; course will include demonstration of laboratory techniques. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG* 101 W.

CJS* 250

POLICE ORGANIZATION &

ADMINISTRATION

3 semester hours Offered: Fall Semester This course is designed as an introduction to the theory and practice of police organization and administration and deals with the various components of modern criminal justice agencies as they relate to the members of the organization and the community. Instruction will include issues confronting police organizations in the 21st Century, including the issues of discipline and union matters. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG* 101 W.

CJS* 258

STREET GANGS & ORGANIZED CRIME

3 semester hours

Offered: Spring Semester Examination of the origin, growth, and structure of organized crime, and the drug cartels. Organized street gangs, which can be defined as a criminal enterprise operating throughout the U.S., will also be explored. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG* 101 W.

CJS* 291

CRIMINAL JUSTICE PRACTICUM

3 semester hours

Offered: Fall Semester College-approved and supervised position related to the student’s criminal justice program, obtained by the student with a public or private criminal justice agency. Students are evaluated by a member of the College faculty and the staff of the cooperating agency. This course requires a mandatory meeting in late May after Final Exams and weekly meetings during the semester. At this meeting students will receive a Field Manual and other materials necessary to secure a site placement. Registration for this course will close on or about June 1st. Prerequisites: 2.0 cumulative GPA AND 12 CJS* credits with a “C” or better AND consent of instructor. www.nwcc.edu 149

CJS* 298

SPECIAL TOPICS IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE

1-3 semester hours

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters One credit courses are designed to be presented in a twoday format, usually on consecutive Saturdays. Three of these 1 credit classes can be bundled to fulfill the Criminal Justice elective or an open elective. Topics change each semester. Check the college schedule for listings of topics and time frames. The two or three credit course topics will vary when offered.

DEAF STUDIES

DSC* 110

ORIENTATION TO DEAFNESS

3 semester hours

An overview of Deafness that encompasses three maj or topics: the nature and experience of Deafness; the education of Deaf children and adults; and the adult Deaf community. Medical, educational, psychological, social, and vocational aspects are considered. Corequisite: ASL* 101. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG* 101 .

DSC* 114

INTRODUCTION TO DEAF PEOPLE &

DEAF CULTURE I

3 semester hours Analysis and discussion of the historical and cultural aspect of Deaf people. In the last decade, definitions of attitudes toward Deaf people have changed from a clinical perspective to a cultural perspective that identifies, respects and promotes Deaf Culture. An overview of Deafhood that will include the nature and experience of Deafhood; the education of Deaf children and adults; and the adult Deaf community. Classes may host guest lecturers from the Deaf Community. Prerequisites: ASL* 102 with a “B” or better AND eligibility for ENG* 101 .

DSC* 218

SELECTED TOPICS IN DEAF STUDIES

3 semester hours

This course will focus on the current trends and events that have an influence on Deaf and hard of hearing individuals in society. The various agencies serving the Deaf will be researched, discussed, and analyzed. Current events in the world and how they impact the Deaf community will be discussed. Further topics may include the ongoing debates of education, medical breakthroughs, forms of communication, Deaf professionals, and other topics as deemed relevant as they relate to Deafness. Students will be required to visit and interview an employee of an agency serving the Deaf and create a PowerPoint presentation to show the class. Students must be fluent enough to sign for themselves and understand the teacher’s presentation taught in ASL. Prerequisites: ASL* 201 with a “B” or better.

DSC* 219

AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE LITERATURE

3 semester hours

Analysis and discussions of ASL poetry and storytelling as part of receptive/expressive language development and advanced skills enhancement. This course also includes storytelling techniques through the use of standard American folklore and other culturally valued forms of literature. Videos of Deaf poets, sign language stories and other esoteric aspects of Deaf culture, such as sport signs, will be evaluated by the students. Prerequisites: ASL* 201 AND DSC* 114 both with a “B” or better.

DSC* 222

FIELD EXPERIENCE IN DEAF STUDIES

3 semester hours

Student work experience of one hundred (100) hours in an agency providing services for Deaf people under the supervision of the staff of the agency and the instructor. The instructor will place and evaluate the students in an approved agency. Meet one hour a week in the class or as instructor determines. Prerequisites: ASL* 201 AND ASL* 205 AND DSC* 114 AND ASL* 202 AND DSC* 218 AND DSC* 219 , all with a “B” or better, (ASL* 202 , DSC* 218 , and DSC* 219 may be taken concurrently).

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

ECE* 101

INTRODUCTION TO EARLY CHILDHOOD

EDUCATION

3 semester hours Offered: Fall Semester This course explores philosophies, methods, and materials dealing with early childhood education. Emphasis is placed on the roles and responsibilities of teachers working with young children and the practical aspects of the physical, cognitive, emotional, and social development of children. This course requires twelve (12) hours of observation (at an instructor-approved or NAEYC-accredited center) in order to receive credit. Field trips may be required. Offered as a hybrid. Prerequisite: Eligibility f or ENG* 101 W or ENG* 101 OR consent of the instructor.

ECE* 103

CREATIVE EXPERIENCES FOR YOUNG

CHILDREN

3 semester hours Offered: SpringSemester Theory and approaches to creative art, movement, and dramatic activities for young children. Information on why and how these activities should be included in curriculum planning. Students are responsible for planning and presenting activities to young children in a preschool setting with a supervising teacher present. Field trips may be required. Offered onground. Prerequisite: Eligibility f or ENG* 101 W or ENG* 101 OR consent of the instructor. 150 www.nwcc.edu

ECE* 106

MUSIC & MOVEMENT FOR YOUNG CHILDREN

3 semester hours

Offered: SpringSemester Basic techniques and skills for teaching music to young children will be explored in the course. Students will explore space, time, beat, rhythm, dance, movement, stories and song both creatively and traditionally to create a wellbalanced music and movement program. Field trips may be required. Offered onground. Prerequisite: Eligibility f or ENG* 101 W or ENG* 101 OR consent of the instructor.

ECE* 109

SCIENCE AND MATH FOR YOUNG

CHILDREN

3 semester hours Offered: SpringSemester This course will provide basic theories of teaching science and mathematics to young children. A variety of practical activities and ideas will be explored for classroom implementation. Topics include the number system, arithmetic, physical science, and life science. Field trips may be required. Offered onground. Prerequisites: ECE* 101 with a “C” or better AND eligibility for ENG* 101 W or ENG* 101 OR consent of the instructor.

ECE* 141

INFANT/TODDLER GROWTH &

DEVELOPMENT

3 semester hours Students will be developing caregiving and teaching techniques appropriate for children from birth to age 3 years. They will be concentrating on learning how to set up an environment which is responsive to infants’ and toddlers’ physical, cognitive, social, and emotional needs. Emphasis will be placed upon how the caregiver interacts with the young child to develop trust and learning. This course requires twelve (12) hours of infant/toddler observation in order to receive credit. Offered online. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG* 101 W or ENG* 101 OR consent of the instructor.

ECE* 176

HEALTH, SAFETY AND NUTRITION

3 semester hours

Offered: Fall Semester This course provides students with the development of activities and resources as the basis for an appropriate health curriculum that encompasses all aspects of a healthy child. Students will become aware of the interrelationships between child development and the areas of health, nutrition and safety. Students are responsible for planning and presenting lessons which include food preparation. This course requires twelve (12) hours of observation in order to receive credit. Field trips may be required. Offered onground. Prerequisites: ECE* 101 with a “C” or better AND eligibility for ENG* 101 W or ENG* 101 OR consent of the instructor.

ECE* 182

CHILD DEVELOPMENT

3 semester hours

This course is concerned with human development from prenatal through age eight with particular emphasis on the preschool child. The cognitive, creative, physical, personal, social and emotional benchmarks through successive stages of development will be studied in depth. This course requires twelve (12) hours of observation (at an instructor-approved or NAEYC-accredited center) in order to receive credit. Offered online. Prerequisite: Eligibility f or ENG* 101 W or ENG* 101 OR consent of the instructor.

ECE* 206

ADMINISTRATION & SUPERVISION OF

EARLY CHILDHOOD PROGRAMS

3 semester hours This course aims to develop knowledge of and professional attitude toward business, legal, and psychological issues of interest to in-home child care specialists and directors or owners of early childhood facilities. The goal of this course is to provide the student with guidelines f or a career in a nurturing home day care and/or for establishing a child care center. This course requires twelve (12) hours of observation (at an instructor-approved or NAEYCaccredited center) in order to receive credit. Field trips may be required. Offered online. Prerequisites: ECE* 101 AND ENG* 101 or ENG* 101 W AND at least one other ECE course, all with a “C” or better, OR consent of the instructor.

ECE* 210

OBSERVATION, PARTICIPATION & SEMINAR

3 semester hours

Offered: Fall Semester This course is designed to increase objectivity in observing and interpreting children’s behavior, and increases the awareness of normal patterns of behavior. Observation and participation are used to gain experience and competency in working with young children. In addition to attending a weekly seminar, the student will observe and participate in an instructor-approved or NAEYC-accredited center for two (2) hours per week, with a required minimum of twenty-four (24) hours. Weekly seminar sessions with the instructor will be held to discuss and plan for the children’s learning needs. Offered as a hybrid. Prerequisites: ECE* 101 AND ENG* 101 or ENG* 101 W AND at least one other ECE course, all with a “C” or better, OR consent of the instructor. www.nwcc.edu 151

ECE* 222

METHODS AND TECHNIQUES IN ECE

3 semester hours

Offered: SpringSemester This course is intended to train students in planning and implementing a developmentally appropriate curriculum designed to enhance the development of young children. Some components of K – 3 and all aspects of the prekindergarten curriculum will be discussed and examined. Students will have the opportunity to experiment with the curriculum using a variety of teaching styles. This course takes into account the multicultural backgrounds and interests of the students as well as the diverse backgrounds of the children they may encounter. This course requires twelve (12) hours of observation in order to receive credit. Offered as a hybrid. Prerequisites: ECE* 101 AND ECE* 210 AND ENG* 101 or ENG* 101 W, all with a “C” or better, OR consent of the instructor.

ECE* 231

EARLY LANGUAGE & LITERACY

DEVELOPMENT

3 semester hours Offered: SpringSemester This course explores principles of language development in the young child. With an emphasis on exploring how a child’s cultural background and experiences influence emerging literacy. Immersion, constructive writing, inventive spelling, and other aspects of the whole language classroom will be studied. The focus will be on how the teacher’s role is pivotal in this process. This course requires twelve (12) hours of observation in order to receive credit. Field trips may be required. Offered as a hybrid. Prerequisites: ECE* 101 AND ENG* 101 or ENG* 101 W AND at least one other ECE* course, all with a “C” or better, OR consent of the instructor.

ECE* 275

CHILD, FAMILY, AND SCHOOL RELATIONS

3 semester hours

Offered: Fall Semester This course is an in-depth look at the child, family and the relationship between the school and the family. The course will review the socialization process and the development of the child/student as a social being. An understanding of the young child and age appropriate guidance for the young children and an understanding of how and why effective communication with families and the community is essential in early education will be examined. This course requires twelve (12) hours of observation in order to receive credit. Field trips may be required. Offered as a hybrid. Prerequisite: ECE* 101 AND ENG* 101 or ENG* 101W, all with a “C” or better, OR consent of the instructor.

ECE* 290

STUDENT TEACHING I & SEMINAR

3 semester hours

Offered: Fall Semester This course is a supervised observation and participation in the teaching experience. Students are required to have a hundred (100) hours a semester of clinical experience in an instructor-approved or NAEYC-accredited placement site. Weekly seminars are scheduled for discussion. Field trips may be required. This course requires fingerprinting and medical evaluation at the student’s expense. Prerequisites: ECE* 101 AND ENG* 101 or ENG* 101 W AND ENG* 102 AND at least two other ECE courses, all with a “C” or better, AND current First Aid Certificate AND consent of program coordinator AND a 2.5 GPA in all ECE courses, AND consent of the program coordinator.

ECE* 291

STUDENT TEACHING II & SEMINAR

3 semester hours

Offered: SpringSemester This is a continuation of Student Teaching I. A hundred (100) hours of student teaching is required in an instructorapproved or NAEYC-accredited placement site. During this phase of the work experience, the student will concentrate on working directly with young children. The overall objectives are for the student to be able to manage a classroom effectively, plan, organize, execute and evaluate classroom activities on a weekly basis and be able to evaluate objectively his or her emerging pre-teaching skills. The student will be under the supervision of an onsite supervisor as well as the College instructor. Weekly seminars will be required. Prerequisites: ECE* 290 AND at least three additional ECE courses, all with a “C” or better, AND a 2.5 GPA in all ECE courses AND consent of the program coordinator.

EDUCATIONAL PARAPROFESSIONAL

EDU* 102

EDUCATIONAL PARAPROFESSIONAL

3 semester hours

This three (3) credit course will introduce core content area skills in reading, mathematics, and writing needed to prepare students for working as a paraprofessional in a public school setting. Students will gain an in-depth understanding about identified disabling conditions, related health issues prevalent among mainstreamed students, and how to implement prescribed strategies and initiatives that promote learning in a classroom or resource room setting. Through interactive activities, participants will become familiar with special education mandates and how they impact the delivery of service to special needs students in today’s public school classrooms. Prerequisite: ENG* 101 or ENG* 101 W, with a “C” or better, OR consent of the instructor. 152 www.nwcc.edu

ECONOMICS

ECN* 101

PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS

3 semester hours

Economics is a social science and like the physical sciences is a tool for breaking down complex problems into simpler parts that can be analyzed one at a time (Nasar, 2011). Alfred Marshall, 1873, described economics as an “organon”, an instrument or analytical tool used in acquiring a body of scientific principles. Consistent with scientific empirical experiments, Marshall envisioned that the governing dynamics of economic theory would continually require perfection (Nasar, 2010). Today, macroeconomics is concerned with the general state of a country’s economy and the degree to which the economy uses and expands its capacity for producing goods and services. That is, the efficient and effective deployment of scarce resources. As a result, macroeconomics deals with some of the most controversial and market system performance issues of our time-globalization, growth, uncertainty, inflation, taxes, interest rates, income determination, unemployment, budget deficits, GDP, currency valuation, foreign direct investment, financial crises, monetary policy, fiscal policy, and the role of government. Prerequisites: Eligibility for ENG* 101W or ENG* 101 AND MAT* 137 X.

ECN* 102

PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS

3 semester hours

Microeconomics is the study of choices that individuals and businesses make and the influence that government has on price responses, market models, cost benefit analysis and rationality. Microeconomics covers microeconomics concepts, the characteristics of different competitive structures including perfect competition, monopolistic completion, oligopolies and monopolies and microeconomic models. The principles of economic cost and profit, economies, scale, marginal costs and utility. Prerequisites: Eligibility for ENG* 101 W or ENG* 101 AND MAT* 137X.

ENGINEERING SCIENCE

EGR* 111

INTRODUCTION TO ENGINEERING

3 semester hours

Students will be introduced to the fields of engineering through design and graphics and comprehensive engineering projects. Topics include: sketching, charts, graphs, forces, energy, electrical circuits, mechanisms, robotics, manufacturing technologies, and fundamentals of engineering economics. Prerequisites: Eligibility for ENG* 101 AND MAT* 186 .

ENGLISH

ENG* 096

INTRODUCTION TO COLLEGE ENGLISH

6 semester hours

This course prepares students for the reading and writing demands in Composition and other college-level courses by integrating reading, writing, and critical thinking. Student writing will focus on understanding, reporting on, reacting to, and analyzing the ideas of others. Texts will serve as models and sources for students to refine their skills in exposition, interpretation, and argumentation. Students learn and practice specific college-level skills through critical reading and writing, class discussions, lectures, group presentations, or workshops. This course does not satisfy an English requirement or an elective in any degree program, nor do its credits count toward graduation. Prerequisite: Satisfactory placement test scores.

ENG* 101

COMPOSITION

3 semester hours

An introduction to the principles of effective composition. The course focuses on expository rather than personal writing. Successful completion of a research paper is required. Practice in writing essays based on analysis of student and professional works. Prerequisites: ENG* 085 ,

ENG* 093

, or ENG* 096

with a “C” or better or satisfactory

placement test scores. ENG* 101 W COMPOSITION WITH WORKSHOP 4 semester hours Composition (ENG* 101 ) focuses on the study and practice of effective written communication across a variety of rhetorical situations. The course develops skills in applying language conventions, engaging with and using authoritative sources, and crafting logical arguments. Composition with Embedded Support (ENG* 101 W) meets the same outcomes as ENG* 101 , but offers students additional support through supplemental instruction, increased time on task, focused workshops, and/or tutoring. Prerequisites: ENG* 085 or ENG* 093 or ENG* 096 with a “C” or better OR satisfactory placement test scores.

ENG* 102

LITERATURE & COMPOSITION

3 semester hours

Further practice in composition based on analysis of short stories, poetry, and drama. Includes additional practice in research techniques. Prerequisites: ENG* 101 or ENG* 101W with a “C” or better.

ENG* 211

THE SHORT STORY

3 semester hours

Close reading and analysis of short fiction. Includes both traditional forms and modern experimental prose. Lecture, discussion, group projects, films and writing essays. Prerequisites: ENG* 102 with a “C” or better OR consent of instructor. www.nwcc.edu 153

ENG* 213

POETRY

3 semester hours

Practice in the close reading and analysis of poetry across a wide range of English and American work from a variety of time periods. Emphasis on how poems work: prosody, diction, figurative language, structure, tone, and theme. In addition, students will practice writing their own poetry, exchanging work and critiquing one another. Prerequisites: ENG* 102 with a “C” or better OR consent of instructor.

ENG* 214

DRAMA

3 semester hours

This 3 credit course will trace the development of the theatre from its Greek base to its modern identity. Most of the major literary periods with their dominant themes will be highlighted. A field trip to view a production will be featured along with guest speakers based in the profession. Prerequisites: ENG* 102 with a “C” or better OR consent of instruct or ENG* 221 AMERICAN LITERATURE I 3 semester hours Reading and study of examples of American literature from the colonial period to the mid-nineteenth century. The class will study significant writers of the time period and examine the development of the themes of individualism, idealism, opportunity, equality, and inclusion as they appear across a range of genres. Prerequisite: ENG* 102 with a “C” or better OR consent of instructor.

ENG* 222

AMERICAN LITERATURE II

3 semester hours

Reading and study of examples of American literature from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. The class will study significant writers of the time period and explore the themes of individualism, idealism, opportunity, equality, and inclusion as they appear across a range of genres. An overview of literary movements will be provided. Prerequisite: ENG* 102 with a “C” or better OR consent of instructor.

ENG* 229

TOPICS IN AMERICAN STUDIES

3 credits

This seminar will examine the historical and literary definitions of what it means to be an American. Through historical documents, novels, short stories, and other printed sources, students will investigate how various events and ideas intertwined to define important aspects of American culture. The class will be run as a seminar with emphasis placed on individual reading and class discussion. Students will be responsible for class presentations on several topics. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG* 101 OR consent of instructor.

ENG* 231

BRITISH LITERATURE I

3 semester hours

A study of selected British Literary works in the maj or genres of poetry, prose and drama from the eighth to the mid-eighteenth centuries by means of readings, films, and discussions. Prerequisite: ENG* 102 with a “C” or better OR consent of instructor.

ENG* 232

BRITISH LITERATURE II

3 semester hours

A study of selected British Literacy works in the maj or genres of poetry, drama, and prose from the late eighteenth century to the present by means of readings, films, and discussions. Prerequisite: ENG* 102 with a “C” or better OR consent of instructor.

ENG* 240

STUDIES IN WORLD LITERATURE

3 semester hours

An exploration of universal themes and various cultural perspectives through readings, films, and discussions. Prerequisite: ENG* 102 with a “C” or better OR consent of instructor.

ENG* 260

WOMEN’S LITERATURE I

3 semester hours

The themes of love, work, and marriage will be explored as the heroines of these novels and stories are forced to make life choices, often between marriage and a vocation, individuality and society’s narrow expectations. Authors include both established and neglected 19th and early 20th century American women writers, many of them surprisingly modern in their themes and writing styles. Prerequisite: ENG* 102 with a “C” or better OR consent of instructor.

ENG* 262

WOMEN’S LITERATURE II

3 semester hours

This course will introduce students to a variety of contemporary women writers. Focus will be on both the diversity and commonality of women’s experience, as explored in 20th century short story, novel, and poetry. Several women writers may visit class to read and discuss their work. Prerequisite: ENG* 102 with a “C” or better OR consent of instructor. 154 www.nwcc.edu

ENG* 266

GAY AND LESBIAN LITERATURE

3 semester hours

This is a survey course in literature written by, about, or for gay men and lesbians in the twentieth and twentyfirst centuries. We will study a variety of representations of homosexuality in a selection of fictional and non-fictional texts. The course will examine the concept of gay and lesbian literature as a genre in order to better understand the relationship between literary expression, personal identity, and our modern views on sexuality as a society. The class is offered to students of all different sexual orientations and identities. This class is for those who are interested in gay & lesbian identity, whether this relates to someone who is transsexual, heterosexual, homosexual, bisexual , transgendered, queer, or of any other sexual orientation or identity. This class will be a safe space for any questions or comments related to the literature we read, class discussions, or other related themes that will emerge over the course of the term. Prerequisite: ENG* 102 with a “C” or better OR consent of instructor.

ENG* 271

FILM AND LITERATURE

3 semester hours

The course examines film both as a genre and in its relationship to literature. Film is a relatively new art form that has only recently earned its place in both academic and popular culture as a leading medium for storytelling. The course will consider film techniques and will focus on how films tell stories that engage viewers in unique ways. The course will touch on the history of film and will consider the relationship of film to literature. Students will consider elements common to film and literature such as character development and presentation, narrative tension and structure, diction and point of view, as well as such innate differences as arise between a reader visualizing a literary text and an onlooker engrossed by a filmed moving image. Prerequisite: ENG* 102 with a “C” or better OR consent of instructor.

ENG* 281

CREATIVE WRITING

3 semester hours

Composition in prose, poetry, or dramatic form. Assignments include a variety of writing styles, such as dialogue, argument, narrative, and description. Students will be expected to share their work and critiques within the class. Each student also submits for approval a lengthier project of his or her own choosing to complete by the end of the semester. Prerequisite: ENG* 102 with a “C” or better OR consent of instructor.

ENG* 284

ADVANCED CREATIVE WRITING

3 semester hours

This course gives students the opportunity to continue their creative writing on a more intensive and complex level. Prerequisite: ENG* 281 with a “C” or better OR consent of instructor.

ENG* 291

MYTHOLOGY

3 Semester hours

Heroes, monsters, quests, and romance! This course will examine enduring archetypes that run through world mythology. Myths are older than the written word, and they have shaped cultures for centuries. From Beowulf to Homer and Cinderella to Superman, these are the stories that help us make sense of the world. What do these stories have in common? And why do we continue to be drawn to these types of narratives? The course explores mythology through the ages from ancient monsters to medieval knights and princesses and even modern day superheroes. The course is offered fully online via Blackboard. Pre-requisites: ENG* 101 or ENG* 101 W AND ENG* 102 with a “C” or better.

ENG* 298

SPECIAL TOPICS IN LITERATURE OR

WRITING

3 semester hours This course gives students the opportunity to explore a more advanced topic in one area of literature or writing in greater depth. Topic will vary from semester to semester. Prerequisite: ENG* 102 with a “C” or better OR consent of instructor.

ENVIRONMENTAL AND EARTH SCIENCE

EAS* 102

EARTH SCIENCE

3 semester hours

Offered: Spring and Summer Semesters For non-science, education, AND science majors. Offered online. An exploration of the basic processes that have formed and continue to form our planet. Included in the content is an astronomical history of the Earth and universe; geology basics including: the geologic time scale, the rock cycle, plate tectonics, earthquakes, volcanoes, mountain building, and erosional forces. Other topics included will be atmospheric processes and trends, global and regional climate, ocean tides and currents, and ecosystems. Current environmental and global issues as they relate to Earth Science will be discussed. The use of computers and Blackboard are integral aspects of this course. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG* 101 . www.nwcc.edu 155

EVS* 100

INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL

SCIENCE

3 semester hours Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer Semesters For non-science, education, AND science majors. Offered online and onground. This three credit, non-laboratory science course is designed to provide an overview of long-term effects on the well-being of the planet and its inhabitants. The course will examine ethics, attitudes and history; natural systems; population; global and regional environmental issues including: biodiversity loss, overconsumption of resources, food production and challenges, energy sources, pollution, waste, and urbanization; and economics, solutions, and attitudes, using current and historical topics as a lens to examine the complexities of these topics. The use of computers and Blackboard are integral aspects of this course. Prerequisite: Eligibility f or ENG* 101 .

GEOGRAPHY

GEO* 101

INTRODUCTION TO GEOGRAPHY

3 semester hours

Introduces basic principles, concepts, and methods of modern geography. Focuses on the physical environment and climate and their relationship to human settlement patterns, as well as the interrelationship between place and self. Prerequisites: ENG* 101 or ENG* 101 W with a “C” or better OR ENG* 101 with concurrency.

GEO* 111

WORLD REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY

3 semester hours

Study of geographic relationships among natural and cultural environments of the world’s major culture regions with specific reference to the non-western world. Prerequisites: ENG* 101 or ENG* 101 W with a “C” or better OR ENG*101 with concurrency.

GERMAN

GER* 101

ELEMENTARY GERMAN I

3 semester hours

Offered: Fall Semester Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG* 101 OR consent of instructor.

GER* 102

ELEMENTARY GERMAN II

3 semester hours

Offered: Spring Semester Prerequisite: GER* 101 with a “C” or better and eligibility for ENG* 101 OR consent of instructor.

GRAPHIC DESIGN

GRA* 151

GRAPHIC DESIGN I

3 semester hours

(6 studio hours) Offered: Fall Semester An investigation of the creative and practical aspects of typography and page layout. It is an exploration of the development of type rendering, typographic principles, type anatomy and computer software skills. The vocabulary and history of typography as well as file management, output service bureaus, and final presentation will be discussed. Career possibilities in the field are discussed and the Macintosh computer is introduced. No previous graphic design experience necessary.

GRA* 227

INTERACTIVE MEDIA

3 semester hours

(6 studio hours) Offered: Fall Semester This course provides an introduction to the principles and processes of interactive design specifically for web-based media. It will build on the principles and techniques learned in Graphic Design I & II. It will focus on the look and feel of interactive documents as well as the principles of aesthetics in regard to online information. Aspects of interactive media to be learned include: HTML & CSS, wireframing, interface design and using CSS3 and jQuery to create basic animations. Project planning, proper file organization and working with clients will be discussed, as well as online culture and the use of the internet in society. Prerequisite: GRA* 151 AND GRA* 252 , both with a “C” or better, OR consent of the instructor.

GRA* 252

GRAPHIC DESIGN II

3 semester hours

(6 studio hours) Offered: Spring Semester An introduction to the art and design capabilities of the Macintosh computer. Instruction in drawing, image manipulation and page layout software. Students will be gradually introduced to software packages through a series of graphic design problems. They will be instructed on current professional practices, methodologies, and the terms of Graphic Design. Prerequisite: GRA* 151 with a “C” or better.

GRA* 260

WEB DESIGN

3 semester hours

(6 studio hours) Offered: Spring Semester This course provides an introduction to the principles and processes of online design and development using the Macintosh computer platform. It will focus on the look and feel of sites as well and the principles of aesthetic layout and navigation. All aspects of web design will be learned including: HTML, CSS, digital image preparation, site maps, page layout, navigation, online type techniques and the inclusion of media rich elements such as digital video. Industry standards, ADA accessibility, online culture and the use of the internet in relation to society will also be discussed. Prerequisites: GRA* 151 AND GRA* 252 AND GRA* 227 , all with a “C” or better, OR consent of instructor. 156 www.nwcc.edu

GRA* 291

GRAPHIC DESIGN PORTFOLIO

3 semester hours

(6 studio hours) An independent study course designed to fit the individual needs of each student. Students will be placed in an internship. A mentor and the instructor will monitor progress. Permission from instructor and eportfolio required. Prerequisites: GRA* 253 AND ART* 243 or ART* 272 , all with a “C” or better, AND consent of instructor.

HEALTH CAREERS

HLT* 103

INVESTIGATIONS IN HEALTH CAREERS

3 semester hours

This course is designed to assist traditional and nontraditional college students to meet the expectations of a curriculum and a career in health related fields. The student will become familiar with the rigors of an educational program designed for health careers and the specific skills needed to maximize the student’s opportunity for academic and clinical success. The student will have the opportunity to observe various health care career opportunities and how these professions function in the health care arena. The course will include a comprehensive overview of the duties and responsibilities associated with clinical competency. Interdisciplinary learning strategies, correlating clinical and didactic education, life management skills, work ethics, and critical thinking skills necessary for all health providers will be emphasized. Prerequisites: Eligibility for ENG* 101 or ENG* 101 W AND MAT* 137 X.

HEALTH & PHYSICAL EDUCATION

HPE* 101

through 300 PHYSICAL ACTIVITIES

1 semester hour each (class times and requirements vary)

HPE courses include individual fitness programs, organized group classes, and competitive activities for students of all abilities and interests. HPE courses may be taken in multiple semesters.

HPE* 108

STRENGTH AND TONE

1 semester hour

Push yourself to the limit in this dynamic body conditioning class taught by an AFAA certified group exercise instructor. Consecutive high energy cardiovascular and strength training intervals using a variety of weights and training tools will help participants decrease fat and burn calories while increasing muscle strength and endurance in a pressure free environment. If necessary, modifications to exercises will be shown to suit individual needs and abilities. The instructor will carefully monitor all students for proper form and will make the necessary corrections to avoid any stress or injuries. Students must supply their own mat, hand weights (between 5 & 10 lbs.), resistance tubing and a 65 cm stability ball. Students must meet specified attendance requirements in order to earn a passing grade.

HPE* 261

YOGA

1 semester hour

This yoga course will be an integrative approach to yoga implementing all of the elements necessary to successfully complete a yoga practice or take it to another level. This class may be taken only for a Pass/Fail grade, or on an Audit (non-grade) basis. Students must meet specified attendance requirements in order to earn a Passing grade.

HPE* 274

ZUMBA

1 semester hour

This course, taught by a licensed Zumba® instructor, combines high energy and motivating music with unique moves and combinations that allow participants to exercise with no worries. Zumba® combines traditional Latin dance styles including salsa, mambo, cha-cha, cumbia and merengue, as well as hip hop and belly dancing moves. The routines feature aerobic fitness interval training with a combination of fast and slow rhythms that tone and sculpt the body. By focusing on interval training, classes seek to burn calories without exhausting participants with a high impact pace. Zumba® is based on the theory that a work out should be fun and easy to do. This allows participants to stick to a fitness program and achieve long-term benefits that are good for both the body and mind. This class may be taken only for a Pass/Fail grade, or on an Audit (non-grade) basis. Students must meet specified attendance requirements in order to earn a Passing grade.

HPE* 281

INDOOR CLIMBING

1 semester hour

Students will learn the basics of indoor wall climbing which includes, but is not limited to, safely using climbing equipment presented, the basics of indoor climbing, proper conduct on and around the climbing wall, and team belay on a climbing wall. Students should wear comfortable clothing and shoes that are appropriate for climbing (no flip-flops or open-toed shoes). Students must meet specified attendance requirements in order to earn a passing grade.

HPE* 283

OUTDOOR CLIMBING

1 semester hour

Explore rock climbing outdoors in this beginner’s course focused on basic technique, safety and the connection of climbing with overall well-being. This course functions around personal goal setting and general participation. Grading is not based on how far up students climb or any other measurement of physical ability/agility. The only physical requirement is that students be able to hike 20 minutes on moderate terrain. An orientation session will be held on campus, followed by three all-day climbing trips typically scheduled on Saturdays. Off-campus classes will require students to drive or car-pool to climbing locations in central and western Connecticut, and hike into the climbing area. Individuals with concerns about the physical nature of the class and their ability are encouraged to consult with the instructor prior to registering. Students must meet specified attendance requirements in order to earn a passing grade. www.nwcc.edu 157

HEALTH INFORMATION MANAGEMENT

HIM* 101

MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY

3 semester hours

This course introduces the language of medicine. It will cover the basic structure, spelling, definition, and pronunciation of medical and pathological terms including all organ systems, anatomy, physiology, diseases, diagnosis, and frequently used medical abbreviations. The basic structure of medical terms, including prefixes, suffixes, and roots are presented. The body systems are used as an organizational pattern to presenting these terms.

HIM* 102

INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH CARE

SYSTEMS

3 semester hours This course introduces the student to the field of health information technology. Topics to be covered include the healthcare delivery system, medical records format and content, various filing systems, the environment where the information is gathered, by who the information is used, and the technology behind health information systems. In addition, the course will cover retention policies and procedures, documentation, confidentiality issues, HIPAA, and legal and regulatory aspects of the medical record. This course provides a broad introduction to the health care systems and organizations, public health, participants in the health care system, and the field of health information technology and management, in the United States. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG* 096 .

HIM* 155

FUNDAMENTALS OF CLINICAL INFORMATICS

AND ELECTRONIC MEDICAL RECORDS

3 semester hours This course provides the student an opportunity to investigate electronic information systems in healthcare. It integrates medical, administrative and clinical record management and computer technology for performing common medical practice functions in a simulated EMR. This course is meant to give the student an introduction to Clinical Informatics, and processes for collecting, using, sharing and maintaining patient health information. It offers students fundamental knowledge of health information systems, data management and regulatory concepts f or both ambulatory and acute care settings. The course covers computer hardware and software components, network and World Wide Web technologies, health information standards, as well as hands-on exercises that use current industry EHR software simulations to transform theoretical EHR concepts into practical understanding. Prerequisites: MED* 125 or HIM* 101 AND CSA* 105 , both with a “C” or better.

HIM* 201

HEALTH INFORMATION MANAGEMENT

PRINCIPLES

3 semester hours This course covers health information management emphasizing sources, definitions, collection and presentation of health data and patient record practices. Students will learn the requirements of managing HIM departments and discover the profession of Health Information Management and the many different roles and credentials that are possible. Topics will include electronic data management, document and repository systems, indexes, registries, utilization review, risk management and quality assurance. Retention and destruction of medical records, production and accuracy of patient information, analysis and reporting for decision-making and strategy development, and HIPAA regulations will be covered. Prerequisites: MED* 125 or HIM* 101 AND HIM* 102 AND CSA* 105 , all with a “C” or better.

HIM* 203

PATHOPHYSIOLOGY

3 semester hours

This course provides an introduction to the study of functional changes that accompany human diseases, the pathology and general health management of disease and injuries across the human lifespan. The purpose of this course is to supply the student with basic understanding which will prepare them for the health care setting. This course is designed to the study of disease processes with emphasis placed on prevention and treatment of disease. The topics covered will be common diseases and disorders with emphasis given to cardiovascular, pulmonary, hepatic, renal and reproductive systems along with new and emerging diseases. Components of pharmacology will also be included for each category of diseases. Prerequisites: MED* 125 or HIM* 101 AND BIO* 110 and BIO* 110 L or BIO* 127 , all with a “C” or better.

HIM* 205

MEDICAL CODING: REIMBURSEMENT

METHODS

3 semester hours This course covers ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM medical coding procedures and is designed to help students meet the challenge of today’s changing government regulations and healthcare reporting. Included in the course are in-depth coding content and practice in CPT, PCS and HCPCS Level II coding. Prerequisite: MED* 125 or HIM* 101 with a “C” or better.

HIM* 210

CODING I

3 semester hours

This course covers CPT, HCPCS Level II, ICD-9-CM, ICD- 10-CM and PCS medical coding procedures at an introductory level and is designed to help students meet the challenge of today’s changing government regulations and healthcare reporting. Students will gain hands on coding skills through data abstracting and coding exercises with a focus on the outpatient setting. Prerequisites: MED* 125 or HIM* 101 AND CSA* 105 AND BIO* 110 and BIO* 110 L or BIO* 127 , all with a “C” or better. 158 www.nwcc.edu

HIM* 211

ADVANCED MEDICAL CODING

3 semester hours

This course covers common coding, terminologies and vocabularies used in healthcare delivery and management, such as International Classification of Diseases (ICD), Healthcare Common Procedures Coding Systems (HCPCS), Current Procedural Terminology (CPT), National Drug Codes (NDC), Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine Clinical Terms (SNOMED), Procedure Coding System (PCS), and Diagnosis Related Groups (DRG). Coding applications are considered by specialty and body system, incorporating medical terminology, anatomy and physiology. Designed to help students meet the challenge of today’s changing government regulations and healthcare reporting included in the course is detailed information on health reform, ethical, legal, and compliance issues that relate to coding and reimbursement. Students will gain hands on coding skills through data abstracting, auditing of chart notes, and coding exercises for a variety of healthcare settings. Prerequisites: HIM* 210 with a “C” or better.

HISTORY

HIS* 101

WESTERN CIVILIZATION I

3 semester hours

A survey of ancient societies from classical Greece and Rome through Medieval Europe. Emphasis will be placed on the formation of ancient civilizations and the development of religious thought and institutions (to 1300). Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG* 101 or ENG* 101 W.

HIS* 102

WESTERN CIVILIZATION II

3 semester hours

A survey of Western history from the Renaissance (ca. 1300) through the 20th Century. Emphasis will be placed on the development of modern nation states and institutions. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG* 101 or ENG* 101 W.

HIS* 201

U.S. HISTORY I

3 semester hours

A survey of American history from the Colonial Era through the Civil War. Emphasis will be placed on the underlying trends and movements that helped to forge a nation and then threatened to tear it apart. Prerequisites: ENG* 101 or ENG* 101 W with a “C” or better OR ENG* 101 with concurrency.

HIS* 202

U.S. HISTORY II

3 semester hours

A survey of American history from the Civil War through World War II. Emphasis will be placed on the nation’s internal development and its growth as a world power. Prerequisite: ENG* 101 or ENG* 101 W, with a “C” or better, OR ENG* 101 with concurrency.

HIS* 213

THE U.S. SINCE WORLD WAR II

3 semester hours

A survey of American history from World War II through contemporary times. Emphasis will be placed on foreign policy as well as major political, economic, and social trends. Prerequisite: ENG* 101 or ENG* 101 W with a “C” or better OR ENG* 101 with concurrency.

HIS* 226

THE U.S. CIVIL WAR

3 semester hours

A survey of American history from the antebellum period through the Civil War and Reconstruction periods. Students will analyze the historical antecedents that led the United States into sectional conflict, and they will investigate the lasting effects of the Civil War on American society. Prerequisite: ENG* 101 or ENG* 101 W with a “C” or better OR ENG* 101 with concurrency.

HIS 229

* TOPICS IN AMERICAN STUDIES

3 credits

This course will examine the historical and literary definitions of what it means to be an American. Through historical documents, novels, short stories, and other sources, students will investigate how various events and ideas intertwined to define important aspects of American culture. Emphasis will be placed on individual readings and class discussion. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG* 101 OR consent of the instructor.

HIS* 242

MODERN IRELAND

3 semester hours

A survey of Irish history from the ancient world through the 20th Century. Students will analyze the historical background of critical events in Irish history. Topics for discussion will include the role of nationalism in Irish history and the relationship between Ireland and the United Kingdom. Prerequisite: ENG* 101 or ENG* 101 W with a “C” or better OR ENG* 101 with concurrency.

HIS* 299

INDEPENDENT STUDY IN HISTORY

1, 2 or

3 semester hours Provides students with opportunities to apply their understanding of basic social science methodology in advanced and independent study/research projects. The specific objectives, procedures, and credit hours are established by the student in written form and approved in writing by the faculty member with whom the student will work before the execution of the intended project. A student may repeat the course but the total credits may not exceed six. Prerequisites: ENG* 101 or ENG* 101 W with a “C” or better OR ENG* 101 with concurrency AND previous course work in history AND consent of instructor. www.nwcc.edu 159

HUMAN SERVICES

HSE* 101

INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN SERVICES

3 semester hours

Offered: Fall and Spring Semester The nature and implications of human services. Consideration of mental health; welfare; probation and school services; and public and private social services.

HSE* 202

INTRODUCTION TO COUNSELING /

INTERVIEWING

3 semester hours Offered: Spring Semester An introduction to the basic components of the helping relationship, exploring the unique qualities of therapeutic relationships and elements which tend to interfere with the therapeutic process. An opportunity to develop and practice skills necessary in the therapeutic interview. Prerequisites: HSE* 101 with a “C” or better.

HSE* 203

THEORIES OF COUNSELING

3 semester hours

Offered: Fall Semester Introduction to counseling theories and techniques as used in a variety of settings. The class works together as a therapeutic group and practices skills that are covered in the readings, lectures, films, and discussions. Prerequisite: HSE* 101 with a “C” or better.

HSE* 235

PROFESSIONAL & ETHICAL ISSUES IN

HUMAN SERVICES

3 semester hours Offered: Fall Semester An in-depth study of current professional issues including ethical, legal, and moral standards. The student will apply decision making skills and critical analysis to professional situations where standards conflict. Topics include: confidentiality, duty to warn, client rights, dual relationships, competence, multicultural issues, sanity, malpractice, and expert testimony. Prerequisite: HSE* 101 with a “C” or better.

HSE* 281

HUMAN SERVICES FIELD WORK I

3 semester hours

Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer Semesters Work experience in a private or public agency under the supervision of the staff of the agency and of the College. Employment for a minimum of 180 hours is required. Weekly seminars to review work experiences and discuss problems and procedures. Prerequisite: HSE* 101 with a “C” or better.

HSE* 282

HUMAN SERVICES FIELD WORK II

3 semester hours

Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer Semesters Work experience in a private or public agency under the supervision of the staff of the agency and of the College. Employment for a minimum of 125 hours is required. Weekly seminars to review work experiences and discuss problems and procedures. Prerequisite: HSE* 101 with a “C” or better. INTERPRETING: ASL/ENGLISH Acceptance into the Interpreter Preparation major requires consent of the Program Advisor.

INT* 103

PRE-INTERPRETING SKILLS

3 semester hours

This course is designed to establish the requisite skills essential to subsequent interpreter preparation. Before students can be introduced to the models of interpreting, they must first learn how to analyze and understand incoming source messages. This foundational course will teach various techniques to effectively process information for meaning. Corequisites: ASL* 201 AND ASL* 205 . Prerequisites: ASL* 102 with a “B” or better.

INT* 113

INTERPRETING I: CONSECUTIVE &

TRANSLITERATING

4 semester hours Students are introduced to the technique of consecutive interpreting as a skill development tool for increasing discourse analysis, visualization, and message equivalence and as a practice form for simultaneous interpreting. Students will expressively and receptively interpret from both recorded texts and live speakers in a consecutive/ transliterating format. Additionally, two hours of service learning in the hearing community is required to enhance cultural identity. Prerequisites: ASL* 202 AND ASL* 206 AND DSC* 110 AND DSC* 114 AND INT* 103 AND INT* 121, all with a “B” or better, AND INT* 230 with a “B” or better or with concurrency. 160 www.nwcc.edu

INT* 114

INTERPRETING II: SIMULTANEOUS &

TRANSLITERATING

4 semester hours Students are introduced to English-to-ASL and ASLto-English interpreting in the simultaneous mode. This course will develop the interpreting and transliterating skills needed to process a continuous message from the Source Language to the Target Language. Expressive and receptive skills will continue to be developed to assist students in producing or receiving messages in signed English. Team interpreting is introduced and practiced. Additional strategies for providing peer feedback are developed and refined. Lab hours will provide intense experiential opportunities to practice and hone skills introduced in class. Occasionally lab hours will be satisfied at off-site locations. Corequisites: INT* 214 AND INT* 242 . Prerequisites: ASL* 202 AND ASL* 206 AND INT* 113 AND INT* 121 AND INT* 134 AND INT* 230 , all with a “B” or better.

INT* 121

PROFESSIONAL STANDARDS IN

INTERPRETING

3 semester hours An introduction to the field of interpreting, including an overview of the general socio-cultural systems and sociopolitical aspects involved, as well as professional ethics and standards for interpreting. Corequisite: ASL* 202 AND ASL* 206 . Prerequisites: ASL* 201 AND ASL* 205 AND INT* 103 , all with a “B” or better.

INT* 134

EDUCATIONAL INTERPRETING

3 semester hours

Offered: Winter Intercession This course surveys the field of interpreting in the educational setting. It focuses on an analysis of the educational environment’s impact on the Deaf and Hard of Hearing student and the myriad roles of an interpreter in this setting. Included are discussions on the application of federal and local regulations and the Registry of Interpreters f or the Deaf (RID) Code of Ethics. Prerequisites: ASL* 201 AND INT* 103 AND INT* 113 AND INT* 121 , all with a “B” or better.

INT* 214

ADVANCED INTERPRETING: SIGN-TO-VOICE

3 semester hours

Designed to enhance voicing skills developed in the simultaneous and consecutive interpreting classrooms. Skill building will include team interpreting for formal/lecture type settings. Corequisites: INT* 114 AND INT* 242 . Prerequisites: ASL* 202 AND ASL* 206 AND INT* 113 AND INT* 134 AND INT* 230 , all with a “B” or better.

INT* 230

INTERPRETING WITH SPECIALIZED

POPULATIONS

3 semester hours Offered: Winter Intercession This course is designed to identify and develop the specific skills and knowledge necessary to interpret with individuals of special populations such as persons who are Deaf-blind, aural-oral, or who have minimal language skills/competencies. Prerequisites: ASL* 202 AND ASL* 206 AND DSC* 110 AND DSC* 114 , all with a “B” or better, AND INT* 113 with a “B” or better or with concurrency.

INT* 242

INTERPRETING PRACTICUM & SEMINAR

4 semester hours

The student will complete at least one hundred (100) hours of simulated or practical work experience in supervised settings to conform with state laws. This course will also provide an open forum for discussing questions and concerns arising from the student’s observation of interpreted situations and individual practicum experiences. In addition, students will prepare for securing professional positions upon graduation and establish professional development goals for achieving national interpreter certification. Program experience portfolio presentation will be required at the end of the semester. Corequisites: INT* 114 AND INT* 214 . Prerequisites: INT* 113 AND INT* 121 AND INT* 230, all with a “B” or better, AND consent of instructor.

MANUFACTURING

MFG* 102

MANUFACTURING PROCESSES

3 semester hours

(offered in 8 week session) This course explains common methods of machining used to shape parts to specifications with the emphasis on traditional tool room machinery (lathes, milling machines, drilling machines and grinders). Related topics also include shop safety, hand tools, measurement, layout work and cutting fluids. Students will apply classroom lessons to the fabrication of parts in the lab course. Corequisite: MFG* 103.

MFG* 103

MANUFACTURING PROCESSES WITH LAB

1 semester hour (offered in 8 week session)

This course provides laboratory emphasis on common cutting tools and lathe operations, as well as on associated precision measuring tools and instruments. The labs will involve set-ups and procedures for milling machines, lathes, grinders, drill presses, and measuring instruments. Corequisite: MFG* 102 .

MFG* 124

BLUEPRINT READING I

2 semester hours

(offered in 8 week session) This is the first course in blueprint reading. It starts with the study of orthographic projection. Topics include lines and their uses, auxiliary views, sectional views, basic and special dimensioning, dimensioning practices for holes, chamfers, angle, tapers, keyways diameters and radii. Also, geometric tolerancing and dimensioning is covered. www.nwcc.edu 161

MFG* 125

BLUEPRINT READING II

3 semester hours

(offered in 8 week session) The second course in Blueprint Reading. A further study of simple and complex drawings for machining or assembly purposes. Topics include the application and meaning of geometric characteristics and controls the metric system, weldment, forging and casting drawings and procedures, communication with freehand sketches, blueprint terms and abbreviations. Prerequisite: MFG* 124 with a “C” or better.

MFG* 136

INTRO TO SOLDERING AND CIRCUITS

4 semester hours

(offered in 8 week session) This course will cover topics in soldering, electronic circuits, and manufacturing of PCB assemblies. Students will prepare and complete projects that utilize their acquired skills that are in accordance to the industry standards and their own technique.

MFG* 156

CNC I

2 semester hours

(offered in 8 week session) This course explains methods for operating and set-up of CNC Milling and Tuning machines. Related topics also include shop safety, print reading, hand tools, measurement, layout work and cutting fluids. Students will apply classroom lessons to the fabrication of parts on CNC equipment. Prerequisite: MFG* 102 AND MFG* 103 , both with a “C” or better.

MFG* 202

PRECISION MACHINING

3 semester hour (offered in 8 week session)

This course explains common methods of machining used to shape parts to specifications with the emphasis on traditional tool room machinery (lathes, milling machines, drilling machines and grinders). Related topics also include shop safety, hand tools, measurement, layout work and cutting fluids. Students will apply classroom lessons to the fabrication of parts in the lab course. Corequisite: MFG* 203 Prerequisite: MFG* 102 AND MFG* 103 , both with a “C” or better.

MFG* 203

PRECISION MACHINING LAB

1 semester hour (offered in 8 week session)

This course provides laboratory emphasis on common cutting tools and lathe operations, as well as on associated precision measuring tools and instruments. The labs will involve set-ups and procedures for milling machines, lathes, grinders, drill presses, and measuring instruments. Corequisite: MFG* 202 Prerequisite: MFG* 102 AND MFG* 103 , both with a “C” or better.

MFG* 258

CNC OPERATIONS

3 semester hours

(offered in 8 week session) This course covers 3-axis CNC machining centers and 2-axis turning centers. It is designed to help the student understand the processes, tools, programs, and machines used by machine operators and programmers. Related topics also include shop safety, print reading, hand tools, measurement, layout work and cutting fluids. Students will apply classroom lessons to part programming for the purpose of fabricating parts on CNC equipment. Prerequisite: MFG* 156 with a “C” or better.

MATHEMATICS

MAT* 094

INTRODUCTORY ALGEBRA

4 semester hours

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters This course includes a study of the basic properties and theorems of rational numbers, expressions and equations with polynomials, rational and radical expressions, integer exponents, linear equations in one and two variables, systems of linear equations in two variables, functions, and applications in geometry and algebra. Credit does not fulfill degree requirements and is not transferable outside the Connecticut Community College system. Prerequisite: Satisfactory scores on the math placement test.

MAT* 137

INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA

3 semester hours

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters This course is a further study of algebra and mathematical modeling of functions and relations represented by tables, graphs, words, and symbols. Polynomial functions and expressions with special attention to linear, quadratic, exponential, rational, and radical functions are studied. There is an emphasis on modeling and applications f or all topics. This course fulfills graduation requirements in many degree programs at NCCC. Check with your Academic Advisor if you intend to transfer to a 4-year college or university and wish to complete your math requirements while at Northwestern. MAT* 137 typically transfers as a general elective, not as a math course. Prerequisite: MAT* 085 or MAT* 094 or MAT* 095 , with a “C” or better, OR satisfactory scores on the math placement tests, SAT, or ACT. 162 www.nwcc.edu

MAT* 137

P PRECALCULUS PREPARATION

4 semester hours

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters This course is a further study of algebra and mathematical modeling of functions and relations represented by tables, graphs, words, and symbols. Polynomial functions and expressions with special attention to linear, quadratic, exponential, rational, and radical functions are studied. There is an emphasis on modeling and applications for all topics. This course meets for an hour longer each week than MAT*137 to allow for more time to cover topics that are useful in MAT* 186 . This course fulfills graduation requirements in many degree programs at NCCC. Check with your Academic Advisor if you intend to transfer to a 4-year college or university and wish to complete your math requirements while at Northwestern. MAT* 137 typically transfers as a general elective, not as a math course. Prerequisite: MAT* 085 or MAT* 094 or MAT* 095 , with a “C” or better, OR satisfactory scores on the math placement tests, SAT, or ACT.

MAT* 137

X INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA, EXTENDED

4 semester hours

Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer Semesters This course is a further study of algebra and mathematical modeling of functions and relations represented by tables, graphs, words, and symbols. Polynomial functions and expressions with special attention to linear, quadratic, exponential, rational, and radical functions are studied. There is an emphasis on modeling and applications for all topics. This course meets for an hour longer each week than MAT*137 to allow for more time to work on problems in class, and to review Elementary Algebra concepts as needed. This course fulfills graduation requirements in many degree programs at NCCC. Check with your Academic Advisor if you intend to transfer to a 4-year college or university and wish to complete your math requirements while at Northwestern. MAT* 137 typically transfers as a general elective, not as a math course. Prerequisite: MAT* 085 or MAT* 094 or MAT* 095 , with a “C” or better, OR satisfactory scores on the math placement tests, SAT, or ACT.

MAT* 167

PRINCIPLES OF STATISTICS

3 semester hours

Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer Semesters Basic concepts used in collecting, presenting, and analyzing data; descriptive statistics, probability, distributions, sampling theory, statistical inference to include hypothesis testing, regression, and correlation. The use of the microcomputer for data analysis is an integral part of the course. This course fulfills graduation requirements at Northwestern, and will transfer to a Bachelor’s Degree program as a mathematics course. Check with your Academic Advisor if you intend to transfer to a 4-year college or university and wish to complete your math requirements while at Northwestern. Prerequisite: MAT* 137 or MAT* 137 X or MAT* 137P or MAT* 137 M, with a “C” or better, OR satisfactory math placement test scores or SAT or ACT.

MAT* 186

PRECALCULUS

4 semester hours

Offered: Fall and Spring Semesters An exploration of functions and their graphs. Polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions and their behaviors in a two-dimensional graphing system will be examined and used to model real life situations. Students will also be introduced to the calculation of limits and derivatives. The use of a graphing calculator is an integral part of this course. This course fulfills graduation requirements at Northwestern, and will transfer to a Bachelor’s Degree program as a mathematics course. Check with your Academic Advisor if you intend to transfer to a 4-year college or university and wish to complete your math requirements while at Northwestern. Prerequisite: MAT* 137 or MAT* 137 X or MAT* 137 P or MAT* 137 M, with a “C” or better, OR satisfactory math placement test scores or SAT or ACT.

MAT* 254

CALCULUS I

4 semester hours

Offered: Fall Semester Plane analytic geometry, functions, limits, continuity, derivatives, differentiation of algebraic functions, applications of the derivative, antidifferentiation, the definite integral, and an introduction to transcendental functions. This course fulfills graduation requirements at Northwestern, and will transfer to a Bachelor’s Degree program as a mathematics course. Check with your Academic Advisor if you intend to transfer to a 4-year college or university and wish to complete your math requirements while at Northwestern. Prerequisite: MAT* 186 , with a “C” or better, OR satisfactory scores on the math placement tests or SAT or ACT.

MAT* 256

CALCULUS II

4 semester hours

Offered: Spring Semester Differentiation and integration of trigonometric, exponential, and inverse functions, parametric equations, methods of integration and applications of the definite integral, hyperbolic functions, infinite series. This course fulfills graduation requirements at Northwestern, and will transfer to a Bachelor’s Degree program as a mathematics course. Check with your Academic Advisor if you intend to transfer to a 4-year college or university and wish to complete your math requirements while at Northwestern. Prerequisite: MAT* 254 with a “C” or better. www.nwcc.edu 163

MAT* 268

CALCULUS III: MULTIVARIABLE

4 semester hours

Offered: Fall Semester A course in multivariable calculus for math or science majors. Topics include plane curves, parametric equations and polar coordinates, vectors and solid analytic geometry, vector-valued functions, functions of several variables, partial differentiation, and multiple integration. This course fulfills graduation requirements at Northwestern, and will transfer to a Bachelor’s Degree program as a mathematics course. Check with your Academic Advisor if you intend to transfer to a 4-year college or university and wish to complete your math requirements while at Northwestern. Prerequisite: MAT* 256 with a “C” or better.

MAT* 286

DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS

4 semester hours

Offered: Spring Semester An introductory course in differential equations. Solution methods for differential equations including selected first order equations, nth-order equations, and systems of linear equations using matrix techniques, Laplace transforms, and numerical methods. Series techniques for selected linear differential equations including Bessel’s equation will be considered. Computer software and/ or graphing calculators will be integrated as appropriate throughout the course. Recommended for science and engineering students. This course fulfills graduation requirements at Northwestern, and will transfer to a Bachelor’s Degree program as a mathematics course. Check with your Academic Advisor if you intend to transfer to a 4-year college or university and wish to complete your math requirements while at Northwestern. Prerequisite: MAT* 268 with a “C” or better.

MEDICAL ASSISTING

MED* 111

ADMINISTRATIVE MEDICAL ASSISTING

3 semester hours

The theory, practice, and techniques of fundamental medical office management are presented. An overview of the profession of medical assisting and its role in providing quality health care are examined. Administrative functions, including office responsibilities, medical records, management, medical business correspondence, computer applications and professional communications for the Medical Assistant will be emphasized.

MED* 112

MEDICAL INSURANCE & BILLING

3 semester hours

This course includes the important medical insurance, claims processing and billing issues in healthcare. Insurance terminology, healthcare reform, ethical, legal and compliance issues, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPPA), types of insurance, and the eligibility and benefit structure of a variety of insurance plans including Medicare, Medicaid, Managed Care, TRICARE, and Workers’ Compensation will be covered. Students will learn to generate and manage billing claim forms f or the medical office and other organizations. Students will be prepared to analyze and accurately decipher complicated medical claims and oversee the entire coding, billing and reimbursement process. This introduces students to ICD-9-CM, ICD-10, CPT, HCPCS level II, PCS medical coding procedures and is designed to help students meet the challenge of today’s changing government regulations and healthcare reporting. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG* 101W or ENG* 101 .

MED* 113

HEALTHCARE INSURANCE

2 semester hours

This course presents an overview of healthcare insurance. Course material and discussions will focus on the different types of insurance and various health care plans including government plans, private plans and managed care. There is a focus on federal and state health insurance regulations. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG* 096 .

MED* 115

MEDICAL CODING

2 semester hours

This course will present the theory and practice of fundamental medical billing, collections and insurance processing procedures. The roles of third-party billing and guidelines in health care business practice will be stressed. This is a hands-on coding and billing course requiring basic computer skills. Prerequisites: MED* 113 with a “C” or better (or with concurrency) AND MED* 125 or HIM* 101 AND CSA* 105 AND MED* 111 , all with a “C” or better.

MED* 125

MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY

3 semester hours

This course introduces the language of medicine. It will cover basic structure, spelling, pronunciation and definitions of medical and pathological terms; including all organ systems, anatomy, physiology, diseases, diagnoses, and medical abbreviations. The basic structure of medical terms including prefixes, suffixes, and word roots will be presented. Body systems are used as the organizations framework to present terminology. 164 www.nwcc.edu

MED* 133

CLINICAL MEDICAL ASSISTING

4 semester hours

This course presents the theory and practice of clinical skills used by the medical assistant in a medical office. The course focuses on practices commonly performed in assisting with clinical procedures, developing communication skills between healthcare professionals and patients, and providing patient education and instruction. Topics include clinical asepsis and infection control, physical examinations, vital signs and measurements, assisting with minor surgery, nutrition, patient education, rehabilitative medicine and specialty examinations. Prerequisites: MED* 125 or HIM* 101 AND CSA*105 , both with a “C” or better.

MED* 215

ADVANCED MEDICAL CODING

3 semester hours

This course covers common coding, terminologies and vocabularies used in healthcare delivery and management, such as International Classification of Diseases (ICD), Healthcare Common Procedures Coding Systems (HCPCS), Current Procedural Terminology (CPT), National Drug Codes (NDC), Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine Clinical Terms (SNOMED), Procedure Coding System (PCS), and Diagnosis Related Groups (DRG). Advanced coding applications are considered by specialty and body system, incorporating medical terminology, anatomy and physiology. Designed to help students meet the challenge of today’s changing government regulations and healthcare reporting included in the course is detailed information on health reform, ethical, legal, and compliance issues that relate to coding and reimbursement. Students will gain hands on coding skills through data abstracting, auditing of chart notes, and coding exercises for a variety of healthcare settings. Coding applications are considered by specialty and body system, incorporating medical terminology, anatomy and physiology. Students will gain hands on coding skills through data abstracting, auditing of chart notes, case studies and coding exercises for a variety of healthcare settings. This course increases the coder’s level of competence for code sequencing, compliance and optimal reimbursement. Prerequisites: BIO* 110 or BIO* 127 AND MED* 115 AND HIM* 205 or HIM* 210 , all with a “C” or better.

MED* 216

ELECTRONIC MEDICAL RECORDS

MANAGEMENT

3 semester hours This course provides the student an opportunity to investigate a variety of Electronic Health Records (EHR) and electronic information systems in healthcare. It integrates medical administrative and clinical record management and computer technology for performing common medical practice functions in a simulated Electronic Medical Record (EMR). This course is meant to give the student an introduction to the processes for collecting, using, sharing and maintaining patient health information. It offers students an overview of health information systems fundamental knowledge of health information systems, data management and regulatory concepts for both ambulatory and acute care settings. The course covers computer hardware and software components, network and World Wide Web technologies, health information standards, as well as hands-on exercises that use current industry EHR software simulations. Prerequisites: MED* 125 or HIM* 101 AND CSA* 105 AND MED* 111 , all with a “C” or better.

MED* 245

CLINICAL LABORATORY PROCEDURES

4 semester hours

This course provides an introduction to clinical laboratory procedures and equipment. A study of basic diagnostic ambulatory tests for patient examination, evaluation and treatment are studied. Students will perform venous and capillary blood collection methods. Students will obtain the necessary skills to perform various diagnostic tests performed in ambulatory facilities including hematology and blood chemistry tests, pulmonary function tests, routine urinalysis, and electrocardiograms. Students are required to purchase scrubs or a lab coat to be worn in class. A physical examination and proof of immunization is also required. Prerequisites: MED* 133 with a “C” or better ( or with concurrency) AND MED* 125 or HIM* 101 AND CSA* 105, all with a “C” or better.

MED* 250

PRINCIPLES OF PHARMACOLOGY

3 semester hours

This course is an examination of the more commonly prescribed medications as they relate to specific body systems. Topics include practices, procedures and laws governing the use, dispensing, administration and storage of pharmaceuticals. Terminology relating to drugs and the administration of drugs is emphasized. Medications will be correlated to pathology, common diseases, and treatments as related to body systems. Corequisite: MED* 250 L. Prerequisites: MED* 125 or HIM* 101 AND BIO* 110 and

BIO* 110

L or BIO* 115

or BIO* 127

, all with a “C” or better. www.nwcc.edu 165

MED* 250

L PRINCIPLES OF PHARMACOLOGY LAB

1 semester hour

Laboratory to accompany MED* 250 Principles of Pharmacology. Lab activities cover general principles of medication administration including determination of dosage, preparation, safe administration, and documentation. Systems of measurement and mathematical equivalents used in pharmacology dosage calculations will be covered. Students will participate in lab simulations covering injection techniques, administration of oral, nasal, ophthalmic, otic, topical, transdermal, and metered dose inhaler medications. Corequisite: MED* 250 . Prerequisites: MED* 125 or HIM* 101 AND BIO* 110 and BIO* 110 L or BIO* 115 or BIO* 127 , all with a “C” or better.

MED* 281

MEDICAL ASSISTING EXTERNSHIP

4 semester hours

Preparation and work experience in an ambulatory medical setting under the supervision of the facility staff and College instructor. Students complete 10 hours of simulated training on campus in preparation for a 160 hour experience at an approved site. Practicum experience of at least 160 contact hours enables students to apply the cognitive (knowledge) base and the psychomotor and affective objectives (competencies) they have learned, develop clinical proficiency, and assume responsibility for unpaid performance of clinical and administrative procedures in an ambulatory health care setting. Students will attend a state medical assisting convention, prepare for and apply for a certifying exam and keep a journal of their practicum experience. Students must have current CPR and first aid certification during the entire externship experience. Certifications may be obtained through RLS* 201 . A mandatory Pre-Externship meeting is required in the semester pri or to enrollment in MED* 281 . Prerequisites: MED* 133 AND MED* 245 AND MED* 250 AND MED* 250 L, all with a “C” or better AND completion of all medical assisting designated courses AND consent of the program coordinator.

MUSIC

MUS* 101

MUSIC HIS & APPRECIATION I

3 semester hours

Study of music from the Middle Ages to the present, using lectures, recordings, and outside listening assignments. Previous training not required. A field trip may be required. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG* 096 .

MUS* 109

HISTORY OF MUSIC IN FILM

3 semester hours

Study of the use of music in American and European film from the late 19th century to the present. Learning materials include videos, CDs, photo documentation, lectures and class projects. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG* 096 .

MUS* 124

MUSIC OF THE CLASSICAL PERIOD

3 semester hours

Survey of the music of the classical period (1750 – 1825), including the full flowering of Haydn, Mozart, and their contemporaries. Concert attendance may be required. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG* 096 .

MUS* 137

HISTORY AND APPRECIATION OF JAZZ

3 semester hours

This course is a historical study of jazz from its early roots to the players today. Students will learn about the evolution of jazz and how it has been influenced by technology and society. Students will examine the artists and music in jazz today, and the role of jazz in the past. Various audio and video performances of jazz musicians and ensembles will be analyzed for their effects on this genre of music. Students will attend and critique live performances, and talk with the performing musicians when possible. Topics covered include the New Orleans era, the Big Band era, Swing, Bebop and Hard Bop, the Bossa Nova era, and Jazz today. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG* 096 .

NURSING

NUR* 101

INTRODUCTION TO NURSING PRACTICE

8 semester hours

Classroom: 60 hours Clinical/College Laboratory: 180 hours The student will focus on concepts basic to nursing practice. Emphasis is placed on application of the nursing process, communication, and skill acquisition. Clinical and laboratory experiences offer opportunities to integrate theoretical principles and demonstrate caring and competence in beginning professional role development. Prerequisites: ENG* 101 or ENG* 101 W, with a “C” or better, AND BIO* 212 with a “C+” or better AND BIO* 235 AND PSY* 111 , both with a “C” or better or with concurrency.

NUR* 102

FAMILY HEALTH NURSING

8 semester hours

Classroom: 60 hours Clinical/College Laboratory: 180 hours The student will focus on issues affecting the family, including childbearing, childrearing, geriatric care and intermediate health care needs of limited duration. The medical surgical health problems include care for the client in the perioperative period and the client experiencing orthopedic and simple genitourinary conditions. The course addresses several psychiatric disorders: anxiety and cognitive disorders, common child and adolescent psychiatric disorders. The student will have clinical rotations that provide experience caring for the childbearing family as well as caring for medical-surgical clients across the lifespan. Corequisite: NUR* 103 (must be taken concurrently). Prerequisites: NUR* 101 AND BIO* 235 AND PSY* 111 , all with a “C” or better, AND PSY* 201 AND SOC* 101 , both with a “C” or better, or with concurrency. 166 www.nwcc.edu

NUR* 103

PHARMACOLOGY FOR FAMILIES ACROSS

THE LIFESPAN

1 semester hour Classroom: 15 hours The student will focus on the safe use, pharmacological principles, indications and nursing implications related to drug therapy when caring for individuals and families. Emphasis will be placed on medications used with perinatal, neonatal, pediatric, geriatric and peri-operative clients. The course will stress the general characteristics of selected medications and will include indications, pharmacokinetics, side effects, adverse effects, contraindications, administration, nursing implications across the lifespan, client education and relationship to prior learning. Corequisite: NUR* 102 . Prerequisite: NUR* 101 with a “C” or better.

NUR* 132

LPN TO RN TRANSITION I

2 semester hours

Clinical: 90 hours (includes clinical and on campus laboratory distribution) This course is the final component of the Connecticut League for Nursing LPN to RN Articulation Plan for the Connecticut Community Colleges Nursing Program (CTCCNP) which prepares LPNs to enter the CT-CCNP in the second year of study. Students enrolling in this course have been accepted for admission into the (CT-CCNP) and have chosen the option to enter the third semester. Prerequisites: BIO* 235 AND PSY* 111 AND PSY* 201 AND SOC* 101 , all with a “C” or better or with concurrency, AND Charter Oak State College NUR* 190 with a “C” or better.

NUR* 201

NURSING CARE OF INDIVIDUALS AND FAMILIES I

9 semester hours

Classroom: 60 hours Clinical/College Laboratory: 225 hours The student will focus on holistic care of individuals and families across the lifespan with a variety of health care needs. The needs of clients experiencing endocrine, respiratory, gastrointestinal, cardiovascular conditions and selected mental health disorders are examined. Bioterrorism as a health care issue will be addressed. Clinical laboratory experience provides the student an opportunity to administer care to a diverse population of clients in a variety of acute care and community health care settings. The student will utilize critical thinking, caring, professionalism and communication skills in the care of the client. Emphasis is placed on provision of safe and competent care and development of the professional role as a member of a multidisciplinary health care team. Over the semester, the student is increasingly challenged in the clinical area with more complex client assignments. Corequisite: NUR* 202 (must be taken concurrently). Prerequisites: NUR* 102 AND NUR* 103 AND PSY* 201 AND SOC* 101 , all with a grade of “C” or better, AND ENG* 102 with a “C” or better, or with concurrency.

NUR* 202

PHARMACOLOGY FOR INDIVIDUALS AND FAMILIES WITH INTERMEDIATE

HEALTHCARE NEEDS

1 semester hour Hours: 15 hours The student will focus on safe use pharmacologic principles related to the care of individuals and families across the lifespan with intermediate health care needs. Emphasis will be placed on medications used for clients who have endocrine, gastrointestinal, respiratory, cardiovascular, autoimmune, and psychiatric conditions and clients who are survivors of bioterrorism. Corequisite: NUR* 201 (must be taken concurrently). Prerequisites: NUR* 102 AND NUR* 103, both with a “C” or better.

NUR 203

NURSING CARE OF INDIVIDUALS AND FAMILIES

II

8 semester hours Classroom: 45 hours Clinical: 225 hours The student will focus on the holistic care of individuals, families, and groups with complex health care needs. The student will incorporate critical thinking, caring behaviors, professionalism, and communication skills when providing nursing care in a variety of acute, long-term and/or community settings. The student will have an opportunity to manage a multi-client assignment with an emphasis on safe and competent practice. Corequisites: NUR* 204 and

NUR* 205

(must be taken concurrently). Prerequisites: NUR* 201

AND NUR* 202

AND ENG* 102 , all with a “C” or better.

NUR* 204

PHARMACOLOGY FOR INDIVIDUALS,

FAMILIES AND GROUPS WITH COMPLEX

HEALTH CARE NEEDS 1 semester hour Classroom: 15 hours The student will focus on safe use, pharmacologic principles, indications and nursing implications related to drug therapy in the care of individuals, families, and groups with complex health care needs. Emphasis will be placed on medications used for clients who have acute and chronic renal failure, oncology and neurological conditions, and multi-system dysfunction and clients who choose an alternative therapy. Corequisite: NUR* 203 AND NUR* 205 (must be taken concurrently). Prerequisite: NUR* 201 AND NUR* 202 , both with a “C” or better. www.nwcc.edu 167

NUR* 205

NURSING MANAGEMENT AND TRENDS

2 semester hours

Classroom: 30 hours The student will explore the basic principles of management, leadership and collaborative relationships as they relate to providing safe and competent care. The focus is on the utilization of critical thinking skills to make decisions, priority setting, delegation, legal parameters of nursing practice and ethical issues. The student will expand the concept of caring to the profession of nursing through collegial and interdisciplinary communication. The course facilitates the transition of the student into the profession and his/her role in contemporary nursing practice. Corequisite: NUR* 203 AND NUR* 204 (must be taken concurrently). Prerequisite: NUR* 201 AND NUR* 202 , both with a “C” or better.

PHILOSOPHY

PHL* 101

INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY

3 semester hours

An examination of basic philosophical problems: the nature of God, religion, morality, justice, knowledge, freedom, mind, and reality. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG* 101 .

PHL* 111

ETHICS

3 semester hours

Critically examines different ethical theories and discusses significant contemporary issues such as abortion, nuclear war, suicide, capital punishment, euthanasia, sexual ethics, and aid for the needy. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG* 101.

PHL* 112

MEDICAL ETHICS

3 semester hours

In this course the student will explore the history, philosophy, ethical reasoning, and moral theories impacting healthcare decisions; while investigating ground breaking ethical issues, bioethical cases and laws governing healthcare providers’ and health care workers’ actions. Using case studies to explore the complex issues involved in medical treatment, experimentation and research, students will discuss the philosophies which contributed to the development of ethical codes of practice in the medical professions. Some of the topics being covered include: assisted reproduction, genetics, abortion, euthanasia, allocation of sparse resources, organ donation and the obligations of professional conduct. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG* 101 W.

PHL* 151

WORLD RELIGIONS

3 semester hours

Considers the religious systems of ancient Egypt and Greece as well as Zoroastrianism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, and the great Eastern religious systems. Addresses the idea that religions differ not because they give different answers to basic questions, but because they do not agree on which questions are basic. Prerequisite: Eligibility f or ENG* 101 .

PHL* 178

MODERN PHILOSOPHY

3 semester hours

Looks at the progress of modern philosophical thinking, its modifications and various rejections of long- standing premises. Acknowledges feminism as well as other views that represent modern thought and how it is manifested in aspects of today’s living. Prerequisites: Eligibility for ENG* 101.

PHYSICS & PHYSICAL SCIENCE

PHY* 121

GENERAL PHYSICS I

4 semester hours

(3 class hours/3 laboratory hours) For science majors. A college algebra-based general physics course for the science/technology or engineering technology major or the engineering major that may lack sufficient conceptual understanding of physics. Subject areas include applied mathematical processes and problems in kinematics, dynamics, statics, energy, heat and thermodynamics, and phases of matter. The use of cognitive and mathematical skills employed by scientists and engineers will also be a central focus of this course. The use of computers, analysis software, computer interfaces and sensors will be an integral part of this course. Prerequisites: Eligibility for MAT* 254 AND ENG* 101 . PHY* 110 or satisfactory completion of high school physics course is HIGHLY recommended.

PHY* 122

GENERAL PHYSICS II

4 semester hours

(3 class hours/3 laboratory hours) This is the second course in the college Physics sequence. Subject areas include fundamental concepts and mathematical exposition, applied problems in electricity, magnetism waves, optics, sound, light and as time permits, introduction to modern physics in the area of nuclear and atomic physics, special and general relativity. The use of computers, analysis software, computer interfaces and sensors are an integral part of this course. Prerequisite: PHY* 121 with a “C” or better. 168 www.nwcc.edu

PHY* 221

CALCULUS-BASED PHYSICS I

4 semester hours

(3 class hours/3 laboratory hours) For science majors. A traditional Calculus-based college physics course for the science major or engineering major. Subject areas include applied mathematical processes and problems in kinematics, dynamics, statics, energy, heat and thermodynamics, and phases of matter. The use of cognitive and mathematical skills employed by scientists and engineers will also be a central focus of this course. The use of computers, analysis software, computer interfaces and sensors are an integral part of this course. Corequisite: MAT* 256 . Prerequisite: MAT* 254 with a “C“ or better AND eligibility for ENG* 101 .

PHY* 222

CALCULUS-BASED PHYSICS II

4 semester hours

(3 class hours/3 laboratory hours) This is the second course in the Engineering Physics sequence. Subject areas include applied problems in electricity, magnetism, waves, optics, sound, light and as time permits, introduction to modern physics in the area of nuclear and atomic physics, special and general relativity. The use of computers, analysis software, computer interfaces and sensors are an integral part of this course. Prerequisite: PHY* 221 with a “C“ or better.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

POL* 111

AMERICAN GOVERNMENT

3 semester hours

Surveys the structure, functions, services, and problems inherent in federal governments, as well as factors influencing political action. Students apply the principles of government to modern American life. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG* 101 or ENG* 101 W.

POL* 122

THE POLITICS OF SOCIAL WELFARE

3 semester hours

Offered: Spring Semester Review the basic concepts of social welfare and its social, economic, and political roots. Studies the influence of beliefs about the appropriate role of the government in the economy and in people’s lives on the provision of welfare decision-making and services. Review of basic practices and procedures of federal and state-level social welfare programs. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG* 101 .

POL* 295

POLITICAL SCIENCE INTERNSHIP

6-

12 semester hours A supervised work-study program to provide the student with experience in the Connecticut State Legislature. By application only. Prerequisites: Consent of the Academic Dean.

PSYCHOLOGY

PSY* 104

PSYCHOLOGY OF ADJUSTMENT

3 semester hours

Designed to expand the student’s awareness of self and others, and to allow exploration of choices which are available in significant areas of life such as love, sexuality, identity, alienation, and goals. Prerequisite: Eligibility f or ENG* 096 .

PSY* 111

GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY I

3 semester hours

A study of human behavior and mental processes through the investigation of such topics as biological roots, human development, memory, psychological research, learning, and social influences. This course is a prerequisite for most psychology courses. Prerequisite: ENG* 101 or ENG* 101 W with a “C” or better or ENG*101 with concurrency.

PSY* 112

GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY II

3 semester hours

A study of human behavior and mental processes through the investigation of such topics as sensation, perception, states of consciousness, motivation, and emotion. Personality, psychological disorders, and forms of therapy are discussed. Prerequisite: ENG* 101 or ENG* 101 W with a “C” or better or ENG*101 with concurrency.

PSY* 201

LIFE SPAN DEVELOPMENT

3 semester hours

This course examines physical, social-emotional and cognitive development from conception through old age. Particular emphasis will be placed on research and methodology of the developmental perspective. Prerequisite: PSY* 111 with a “C” or better.

PSY* 204

CHILD AND ADOLESCENT DEVELOPMENT

3 semester hours

This course examines cognitive, physical and socioemotional growth from conception through adolescence. Emphasis is placed on research and methodology within the field. Prerequisite: PSY* 111 with a “C” or better.

PSY* 210

DEATH & DYING

3 semester hours

An opportunity to become more comfortable with the concepts of death. Includes discussion of personal experiences, a review of books and articles, class presentations, films, tapes, and possible guest speakers or field trips. Prerequisite: PSY* 111 with a “C” or better. www.nwcc.edu 169

PSY* 245

ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY

3 semester hours

An exploration of the causes, effects and treatment of abnormal behavior. Topics covered include the difficulty of defining normal and abnormal behavior, critical understanding of diagnostic and research tools used by mental health professionals, and discussion of the possible developmental roots of psychological disorders. Prerequisite: PSY* 111 with a “C” or better.

PSY* 258

BEHAVIOR MODIFICATION

3 semester hours

This course is designed to teach students the theoretical and practical aspects of Applied Behavior Analysis. Principles of both Operant and Classical Conditioning paradigms will be covered. Strict emphasis will be placed on definition and measurement of behavior, identification and methods of reinforcer delivery and analysis of behavioral change. Students will be expected to design and implement a behavior change program as part of the course. Prerequisite: PSY* 111 with a grade of “C” or better.

PSY* 260

PSYCHOLOGY OF THE EXCEPTIONAL

CHILD

3 semester hours Special children, who they are, how they behave, and what can be done to help them. Emphasis on the child in the home and in social environments; school-related problems. Prerequisite: PSY* 111 with a “C” or better.

PSY* 298

SPECIAL TOPICS IN PSYCHOLOGY

1 -

3 semester hours Designed to offer the student an opportunity to understand the investigation of a specific topic in psychology. One to three semester hours are prearranged in writing with the instructor. A student may repeat the course but the total credits may not exceed six. Prerequisites: PSY* 111 with a “C” or better AND consent of instructor.

SOCIOLOGY

SOC* 101

PRINCIPLES OF SOCIOLOGY

3 semester hours

Offered: Fall, Spring, and Summer Semesters Introduces students to patterns of human behavior and social interaction. Areas of focus include, the nature of social adjustment, personality and the socialization process, formal and informal groups, and institutions. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG* 096 .

SOC* 104

SOCIOLOGY OF THE FAMILY

3 semester hours

Offered: Spring Semester This course examines the family as a social institution: its structures, functions, challenges, and changing cultural patterns within a historical and cross-cultural perspective. Prerequisite: ENG* 101 OR ENG* 101 W with a “C” or better AND SOC* 101 with a “C” or better.

SOC* 201

CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL ISSUES

3 semester hours

Offered: Fall Semester Study selected problems in American society, including causes, effects on the individual, and approaches to resolution. Prerequisites: ENG* 101 OR ENG* 101 W with a “C” or better AND SOC* 101 with a “C” or better.

SOC* 240

CRIMINOLOGY

3 semester hours

The course of Criminology deals with the causes of crime and how it relates to our society, as well as the response of society to criminal behavior. The relationship of the criminal justice system and corrections is also explored. Development of the criminal mind and the inmates’ social world within prison are of particular importance. Defining the concept of crime and the nature of criminal law are important aspects of this course of study. The effects of alcohol and substance abuse are prominent factors in modern criminal behavior, since a majority of crimes are related to this type of abuse. How society deals with these social problems will shape the future of criminal acts. Prerequisite: Eligibility for ENG* 101 .

SOC* 241

JUVENILE DELINQUENCY

3 semester hours

This course will examine the social aspects of juvenile delinquency and the pressures which cause this behavi or to emerge. The organization, functions and jurisdiction of the juvenile court system, as well as processing, detention, case disposition and juvenile delinquency statutes, will be discussed. The juvenile delinquency process in many states is being reexamined as today’s youth have learned to abuse an antiquated system. Prerequisite: Eligibility f or ENG* 101 .

SPANISH

SPA* 101

& SPA* 102

ELEMENTARY SPANISH I & II

3 semester hours each These courses are designed to provide a basic foundation of the Spanish language with emphasis on speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Through film and other media, we will also periodically investigate Spanish and Latin American culture. Prerequisite: (F or SPA* 101 ) eligibility for ENG* 101 W OR consent of instructor; (For SPA* 102 ) SPA* 101 with a “C” or better AND eligibility for ENG 101 W OR consent of instructor. 170 www.nwcc.edu

SPA* 201

& SPA* 202

INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I & II

3 semester hours each Continued practice with speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing Spanish. More sophisticated grammatical concepts, such as the subjunctive, are covered, with further emphasis on an appreciation for the variety and richness of Spanish and Latin American culture through readings, film, and internet research. Prerequisite: (For SPA* 201 ) SPA* 102 with a “C” or better AND eligibility for ENG* 101 W OR consent of instructor; (For SPA* 202) SPA* 201 with a “C” or better AND eligibility for ENG* 101W OR consent of instructor.

THEATER

THR* 111

INTRODUCTION TO ACTING

2 semester hours

Offered: Winter Semester Our goal in this class is to awaken the imagination, emotion, and intellect of the student actor. It is the actor who explores and uncovers the meaning and vision of any play they are embarking. Exploring and approaching the voice, speech, movement, as well as an intellectual view of the text, subtext and style. This course will stress both the actor’s ability to use “self” (body, mind and experience) in a believable, honest way, as well as his/her willingness to take risks beyond pre-established boundaries. Corequisite: THR* 111 L.

THR* 111

L INTRODUCTION TO ACTING LAB

1 semester hour

Offered: Winter Semester Students will participate in a variety of exercises and techniques that actors use as tools that help take the text to performance. General rhetorical elements will be examined to help the actor with the exploration of the text. They will develop a personal connection and utilize that connection in developing an understanding of the text. Voice and body training will enable the student to develop the richness of expression that reveals the character’s emotional state. Corequisite: THR* 111 .

THERAPEUTIC RECREATION

RLS* 121

INTRODUCTION TO THERAPEUTIC

RECREATIONAL SERVICES

3 semester hours Introduces students to therapeutic recreational services in hospitals, residential centers, correctional, and special institutions. Relationship of therapeutic recreation with other rehabilitative services.

RLS* 122

PROCESS & TECHNIQUE IN

THERAPEUTIC RECREATION

3 semester hours Acquaints students with physical activities adapted f or various special populations. Adaptive, corrective, and development techniques are explored in lectures, demonstrations, and activities.

RLS* 201

FIRST AID & EMERGENCY CARE

3 semester hours

Theoretical and practical techniques and skills needed to provide early pre-hospital medical care in the event of an emergency. This course will provide an overview of the Emergency Medical System and role of the citizen responder at the scene of a medical or traumatic emergency in a variety of situations including fire and hazardous materials. It offers American Red Cross certification in CPR/ AED for the Professional Rescuer and in First Aid Responding to Emergencies. The course will also cover the basic principles for personal and community emergency preparedness and the potential role(s) of individuals. This is a ‘hands-on’ interactive course.

RLS* 215

RECREATIONAL LEADERSHIP &

SUPERVISION

3 semester hours Application of theoretical and practical leadership methods and skills in park and recreation services. Prerequisite: RLS* 121 with a “C” or better.

RLS* 219

FIELD WORK IN REC LEADERSHIP

3 semester hours

Required field internship for second-year students enrolled in the Therapeutic Recreation certificate or associate degree program. Students must meet with the program advis or prior to enrolling in this course. Prerequisites: RLS* 121 AND RLS* 122 , both with a “C” or better, AND consent of program advisor.

RLS* 221

THERAPEUTIC RECREATION

PROGRAMMING

3 semester hours A study of the equipment selection, leadership techniques and program modifications required for appropriate special programs designed to meet the needs and interests of members of various special populations. Prerequisites: RLS* 121 and RLS* 122 , both with a “C” or better. www.nwcc.edu 171

VETERINARY TECHNOLOGY

VET* 100

INTRODUCTION TO ANIMAL CARE

2 semester hours

Offered: Fall semester This course is designed to give students in the Veterinary Technology Program “hands-on” experience with small, large and laboratory animals. Basic animal husbandry topics discussed include breed differentiation, clinical nutrition, behavior, and species restraint techniques. Prerequisites: Admission to Vet Tech Program; BIO* 121 , MAT* 137, CHE* 111 AND CSA* 105 , all with a “C” or better, AND eligibility for ENG* 101 .

VET* 101

INTRODUCTION TO VETERINARY

TECHNOLOGY

3 semester hours Offered: Fall semester This course is an introduction to veterinary science. The profession and employment opportunities for veterinary technicians are presented. The principles of animal health and the prevention of disease are stressed. Common illnesses, vaccination protocols, basic nutrition and animal reproduction are discussed. Prerequisites: Admission to Vet Tech Program; BIO* 121 , MAT* 137 , CHE* 111 AND CSA* 105 , all with a “C” or better, AND eligibility for ENG* 101.

VET* 102

VETERINARY OFFICE MANAGEMENT &

COMMUNICATION

3 semester hours Offered: Spring semester This course is intended to introduce the student to office procedures and business practices related to private veterinary practices. Topics include reception techniques, telephone etiquette, management of medical records, billing procedures, scheduling of appointments, inventory control, computer use, and staff management. Prerequisites: Admission to Vet Tech Program; BIO* 121 , MAT* 137, CHE* 111 AND CSA* 105 , all with a “C” or better, AND eligibility for ENG* 101 .

VET* 151

SMALL ANIMAL VETERINARY

TECHNOLOGY

4 semester hours (3 class hours/2 laboratory hours) Offered: Spring semester This course will introduce the student to small animal nursing procedures including laboratory animals. Included topics will be restraint, physical examinations, medical and surgical nursing techniques and emergency care. The importance of client education and the role of the veterinary technician in the clinical setting will be stressed. Field trips required. Rabies vaccines must be completed pri or to starting class. Prerequisites: VET* 100 AND VET* 101 , both with a “C” or better.

VET* 152

LARGE ANIMAL VETERINARY

TECHNOLOGY

4 semester hours (3 class hours/3 laboratory hours) Offered: Spring semester This course will be an overview of the technical aspects of large animal veterinary care. Emphasis will be on large animal handling, restraint and medication. In addition, common medical conditions, routine large animal care and preventive health will be discussed. Field trips required. Rabies vaccines must be completed prior to starting class. Prerequisites: VET* 100 AND VET* 101 , both with a “C” or better.

VET* 201

VETERINARY ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY I

4 semester hours

(3 class hours/3 laboratory hours) Offered: Fall Semester This course is the first semester of a two semester sequence designed to provide student with a broad foundation of the structure and function of the major animal species for students intending to pursue a career as a Veterinary Technician or continue on with their education in veterinary science or a related field. Beginning with basic chemistry, the body’s three maj or levels of organization (cells, tissues, and organs) provide the foundation for a systematic investigation of the structure and function of the animal body, for the most common species seen in veterinary practice, including companion animals, livestock, avian, laboratory animals and exotics. The laboratory component allows students to gain experience with the tools and techniques used to study the body on a macroscopic and microscopic level. Students will investigate the connections between the study of anatomy and physiology with clinical veterinary medical and surgical practice. Veterinary Anatomy & Physiology I covers terminology; cell anatomy & physiology; tissues; integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, and endocrine systems and their relationships to other systems. Prerequisites: BIO* 121, MAT* 137 , CHE* 111 , AND CSA* 105 , all with a “C” or better, AND eligibility for ENG* 101 . 172 www.nwcc.edu

VET* 202

VETERINARY ANATOMY &

PHYSIOLOGY II

4 semester hours (3 class hours/3 laboratory hours) Offered: Spring semester This course is the second semester of a two semester sequence designed to provide student with a broad foundation of the structure and function of the major animal species for students intending to pursue a career as a Veterinary Technician or continue on with their education in veterinary science or a related field. This course investigates the structure and function of the animal body, for the most common species seen in veterinary practice, including companion animals, livestock, avian, laboratory animals and exotics. The laboratory component allows students to gain experience with the tools and techniques used to study the body on a macroscopic and microscopic level. Students will investigate the connections between the study of anatomy and physiology with clinical veterinary medical and surgical practice. Veterinary Anatomy & Physiology II covers blood and lymph; immunity; cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive (including the biochemistry of how cells obtain energy from food), urinary, and reproductive systems and their relationships to other systems; avian and reptilian anatomy & physiology. Prerequisite: VET* 201 with a “C” or better.

VET* 205

VETERINARY LABORATORY PROCEDURES

3 semester hours

(2 class hours/3 laboratory hours) Offered: Fall Semester A study of veterinary clinical laboratory procedures including specimen collection, hematology, cytology, blood chemistry, urinalysis, and necropsy technique. Immunology and serology will also be discussed. Lecture incorporates heavy use of PowerPoint images of blood smears, urine, and cytology to aid in identification of cells and structures in the laboratory. The primary source of blood and urine samples for laboratory will be surgery patients from VET*230 L, Anesthesia and Surgical Nursing Lab. In addition, field trips may be required to collect samples for lab. Prerequisites: MED* 125 , VET* 151 , AND VET* 151L, all with a “C” or better.

VET* 212

PRINCIPLES OF IMAGING

1 semester hour (1 class hour/1 laboratory hour)

Offered: Fall semester The principles of radiation and its uses in patient diagnostics are presented as well as the technical skills needed to perform radiological procedures. Alternative imaging techniques are also included. The dog and cat are primarily used in the laboratory. Corequisite: VET* 230 , VET* 230 L AND VET* 240 (all must be taken concurrently). Prerequisites: VET* 151 AND VET*151 L AND VET* 201 AND VET* 202 AND VET* 280 , all with a “C” or better.

VET* 220

ANIMAL PATHOLOGY

3 semester hours

Offered: Spring Semester A study of the more common diseases affecting domestic and farm animals. The causation, progression, transmission, treatment, and prevention are presented. The impact on public health and the role of the veterinary profession are discussed. Prerequisites: VET* 151 AND VET* 151 L AND VET* 152 AND VET* 152 L AND VET* 205 AND VET* 205L AND VET* 212 AND VET* 230 AND VET* 230 L AND VET* 240 , all with a “C” or better.

VET* 230

VETERINARY ANESTHESIA AND SURGICAL NURSING

4 semester hours

(3 class hours/3 laboratory hours) Offered: Fall semester Surgical and anesthetic procedures, including a study of anesthetic drugs, patient preparation and post-op care will be discussed. Training manikins, anatomy models, and live dogs and cats will be used in lab. Corequisites: VET* 240 AND VET* 212 (all must be taken concurrently). Prerequisites: VET* 151 AND VET* 151 L AND VET* 201 AND VET* 202 AND VET* 250 AND VET* 280 , all with a “C” or better.

VET* 238

PARASITOLOGY

3 semester hours

Offered: Spring Semester This course provides an overview of the parasites of greatest importance in veterinary medicine. The course includes both lecture and laboratories to reinforce the knowledge and identification skills necessary for the Veterinary Technician. Prerequisite: VET* 151 AND VET* 151 L AND VET* 205 AND VET* 205 L, all with a “C” or better.

VET* 240

PERIODONTOLOGY AND ORAL

RADIOLOGY

2 semester hours (lecture/lab) Offered: Fall Semester This course will introduce the student to the field of veterinary dentistry. Oral anatomy, terminology, instrumentation, periodontology, and oral radiography will be discussed. The clinical applications of modern veterinary dental care and the role of the veterinary dental hygienist will be emphasized. Dental models and live animals are used in the laboratory. Corequisites: VET* 212 AND VET* 230 AND VET* 230 L (all must be taken concurrently). Prerequisites: VET* 151 AND VET* 151 L AND VET* 201 AND VET* 202 AND VET* 250 AND VET* 280 , all with a “C” or better. www.nwcc.edu 173

VET*250

PRINCIPLES OF PHARMACOLOGY – VET

TECH

3 semester hours (lecture/lab) Offered: Spring semester This course provides an overview of the more commonly prescribed veterinary medications as they relate to specific body systems. Topics include practices governing the use, dispensing, administration, and storage of pharmaceuticals as well as prevention and treatment of parasites. Terminology relating to drugs and administration of drugs is emphasized. Prerequisites: MED* 125 AND VET* 101 , both with a “C” or better.

VET* 280

VETERINARY EXTERNSHIP I

1 semester hour

This externship will offer a supervised experience under the direction of a licensed veterinarian, certified technician or animal research technician. The student will refine skills learned in the first year classes and laboratories. Prerequisites: MED* 125 AND VET* 100 AND VET* 101 AND VET* 151 AND VET* 151 L, all with a “C” or better, AND consent of instructor.

VET* 281

VETERINARY EXTERNSHIP II

2 semester hours

This externship will offer a supervised experience under the direction of a licensed veterinarian, certified technician or animal research technician. The student will refine skills learned in all previous veterinary technology courses. Prerequisites: VET* 205 AND VET* 205 L AND VET* 212 AND VET* 230 AND VET* 230 L AND VET* 240 , all with a “C” or better, AND consent of instructor.

VET* 298

SPECIAL TOPICS IN VETERINARY

TECHNOLOGY

1 - 3 semester hours This course will introduce students to a wide range of topics in a variety of animal-related fields, such as veterinary health care, ancillary animal businesses (grooming, boarding, etc.), animal science, and other current topics in the field of veterinary technology. The course will be open to students in the veterinary technology program, and as a free elective for other students.

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